Cambodian Civil War

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    There are few cases in our world in which a civil war has transformed into a full on genocide. Mainly because it is difficult to garner support for the mass killing of an entire group of people. However, when it does happen it is a major ordeal. The civil war in Rwanda from 1990 to 1994 is one example. The Cambodian civil war from 1970-1975 also demonstrates a civil war turned genocide. These two examples share both similarities and differences in the way in which the whole incident panned out. These two examples are also useful in determining contributing factors to the outbreak of genocide. As there are not many instances of civil wars turning into genocides, the cases in Rwanda and Cambodia can help us to understand the variables enable…

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    no clothes, no families, and no money. Located in Southeast Asia, Cambodia is a country less than half the size of California. From 1975 to 1979 the people of this country were living in the most unbearable conditions. This is due to the fact that on April 17, 1975 Pol Pot commenced mass murders of the upper and middle class Cambodians. Starvation spread like a disease throughout Cambodia because of past government issues, the work of the Khmer Rouge, and failed attempts of aid. Not only was…

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    Essay On Pol Pot

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    Pol Pot: Beast of the Southeast Of all the cruel and horrendous tyrants history has bedeviled upon humanity, Pol Pot is among the most evil and unforgiving. It was under his rule that from 1975 to 1979, millions of innocent lives were snuffed out during an event known as the Cambodian Genocide. The Cambodian Genocide was an effort by the tyrannical government of Cambodia, known as the Khmer Rouge, to establish a perfect communist utopia. They planned to do this by disposing of anyone in the…

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    The Cambodian Genocide was an event where a mass amount of Cambodians were killed for their ethnic differences. The website states, “The Cambodian Genocide took place in Cambodia, a country in Southeast Asia. It began shortly after Cambodia’s seizure of power from the government of Lon Nol in 1975 and lasted until the Khmer Rouge was overthrown by the Vietnamese in 1978. North Vietnamese forces seized South Vietnam’s capital, Saigon, and by the Khmer Rouge and its leader, Pol Pot, in 1975.”…

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    Meas Sokha Analysis

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    Meas Sokha, a former prisoner of the Cambodian Genocide, retold her story about what she experienced during the Cambodian Genocide. She explained how the Khmer Rouge guards would treat the prisoners. The guards took the gall bladders of the deceased prisoners that the guards, themselves, most likely killed, and used them to drink wine (Campbell). Sokha explains the brutality of the Khmer Rouge and how she was treated during the Khmer Rouge. “Sokha also told the U.N. backed ECOC that he witnessed…

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    Pol Pot Propaganda

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    ‘During that time, about 1.5 million Cambodians out of a total population of 7 to 8 million died of starvation, execution, disease or overwork.’ (HIstory.com Staff, 2009). The period of the Khmer warfare is the most remarkable moment of Cambodia’s history. It is also the most catastrophic one. The cultural and civil background of the monarchy and republican eras was suppressed by the Khmer communist regime. During this period Cambodia’s expressive heritage nearly disappear, not only…

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    Pol Pot Genocide

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    For 86 days, they reduced the city to rubble, but that was not all. After the 86 days, they started mass executions of Croat men killing hundreds and put them in mass graves. In 1992 Milosevic in response to declaration of independence of Basina set up snipers in the city of Sarajevo to kill helpless civilians in the streets. 3500 children alone were killed in the city. Bosnian Muslims suffered the same conditions like the Jews during World War 2. The Serbs did mass shootings, forced…

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    killing 25 percent of Cambodia's population(Pol). Through raising tensions between local countries and Cambodia, the Cambodian Killing Fields were considered to be one of the worst genocides in history that has lasting effects on Cambodia today. Background In 1969, Pol Pot had become the leader of the communist party in Cambodia. He eventually fled into the jungle where he hid from the prince of Norodom Sihanouk, the leader of Cambodia and raised an army called the Khmer Rouge; consisting of…

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    Imagine you’re world being turned around from living peacefully and happy to murdering people that you don’t want just to stay alive. This is what people had to go through in Cambodia when Khmer Rouge, a radical Communist regime, came to power in 1975. They started to move people in the countryside and made everyone work, even childrens. Millions of people died by starvation and sickness. In Never Fall Down by Patricia McCormick, people’s physiological states changes three ways, person's…

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    the author William Golding proposes the idea that the defects of society stem from the defects of human nature (204). The Khmer Rouge regime exemplifies that the flaws of society emanate from the abuses of one’s power; unless humans change their morality, society will not improve. Genocide is defined as the deliberate and systematic extermination of a national, racial, political, or cultural group. The genocide of Cambodia can be traced back to Pol Pot, the leader of the Khmer Rouge regime.…

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