Meas Sokha Analysis

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Meas Sokha, a former prisoner of the Cambodian Genocide, retold her story about what she experienced during the Cambodian Genocide. She explained how the Khmer Rouge guards would treat the prisoners. The guards took the gall bladders of the deceased prisoners that the guards, themselves, most likely killed, and used them to drink wine (Campbell). Sokha explains the brutality of the Khmer Rouge and how she was treated during the Khmer Rouge. “Sokha also told the U.N. backed ECOC that he witnessed between twenty and one hundred killing in a single day” (Campbell). This story is only one of the millions that people have experienced being in the Cambodian Genocide. There are only few survivors who are still alive today, but most recall similar …show more content…
After the Cambodian Genocide, about 20% or more of Cambodia’s population was gone (Schanberg). This resulting in about 1.7 million Cambodians dying, which creates a total of 3.3 million deaths in general (Sopheng). The Khmer Rouge’s rule affected many people’s lives and it was not for the good. The Khmer Rouge performed mass killings very frequently, evidence shows there were three hundred and nine mass gravesites. Within these gravesites, were a total of 19,000 actual grave pits, those being the only places where the deceased were actually put in graves (“The CGP”). This is just one example of how brutal the Khmer Rouge was. The Khmer Rouge ruled for too long before Vietnam invaded them in 1979 (“GENOCIDE-CAMBODIA”). Vietnam tried to come in strong to overthrow the Khmer Rouge, but the Khmer Rouge had some allies who tried to help them. The Khmer Rouge’s allies, The United States and the United Kingdom, defended the Khmer Rouge because of their joining dislike of Vietnam and their history with the Vietnam War (“GENOCIDE-CAMBODIA”). In the end, the Khmer Rouge was not powerful enough compared to Vietnam, so the Khmer Rouge was overthrown and a temporary government was put in place for the surviving Cambodians (“Cambodian Genocide Trying to End Genocide”). Prince Sihanouk was re-elected and became the primary government official until the United Nations could step in and review their case. With Cambodia’s …show more content…
In order to prevent genocide, the government officials have to treat their civilians correctly and justly by keeping them under control with an orderly conduct. Being aware of political issues and topics is a helpful way to make sure that no one is getting too powerful (“GENOCIDE-CAMBODIA”). The involvement of powerful armies or strong government defense officials should be monitored to ensure the safety of the country and to ensure a stable government with no overthrowing. If there are any political issues or any major standing present issues throughout the country, finding the root of the problem is a major concern in order for genocide not to occur. The usual commencement of genocide starts with a form of bullying and a disagreement of opinions (“GENOCIDE-CAMBODIA”). Higher ranked government officials often see their citizens as the issue, when they are not the issue. Government officials are often the main cause of genocide because of conflicts between power and how the power is distributed. In this situation, the candidates and voting processes should be examined thoroughly to ensure a fair vote and that the powerful people cannot take control of the main decisions to benefit themselves (“GENOCIDE-CAMBODIA”). In terms of the Cambodian Genocide and how it is being preserved and studied, Yale University created the Cambodian Genocide Justice Program to research information about how

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