Psychedelic rock

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    What Is Psychedelic Rock?

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    Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that is inspired or influenced by psychedelic culture and attempts to replicate and enhance the mind-altering experiences of psychedelic drugs. It emerged during the mid 1960s among folk rock and blues rock bands in the United States and United Kingdom. It often used new recording techniques and effects that drew on non-Western sources such the ragas and drones of Indian music. Psychedelic rock bridged the transition from early blues and folk-based rock to progressive rock, glam rock, hard rock, and as a result, influenced the development of subgenres such as heavy metal. By the end of the 1960s decade, psychedelic rock was in retreat. LSD had been made illegal in the US and UK in 1966. At the end of…

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    During the psychedelic rock movement of the 1970s, there was without a doubt no shortage of artists looking to have their big chance to set the trends in the genre. Although many bands have come and went, few of these classic rocks bands were able to break musical boundaries; let alone make waves in the industry. While there were several psychedelic bands that broke out and managed to change our perception of the psychedelic rock genre, the most notable band of this movement would be no other…

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    The Door Culture

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    as the counterculture. The times were defined by free thought, new ideas of love, psychedelic music, long hair, and drug experimentation . Big names in music like The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, and The Jimi Hendrix Experience had gained a massive following from young people all over America in just a few years. But, none of those groups stormed the culture of the time quite like The Doors did in 1967. According to Mick Wall, after only one album and less than year, The Doors had quickly gained…

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    The hippie movement was the common title Americans used to define the out casted individuals and their actions that began to take place in the early 1960s and continued on through the 1970s. The movement started as vocal opposition to the United States taking part in the Vietnam War. Soon after, this generation ultimately transformed into a liberal counterculture. A counterculture is a subculture that has values and behavioral norms that are substantially different from those of the mainstream…

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    They had the type of music that would just make you get up and dance to the groovy beats or you couldn’t help but sing along. Now a-days it’s been replaced by what some people say has hardly no meaning to it, rap. Not every rap song out there has no meaning to it, there are a couple of songs that do have a meaning and an important message that is crossed over by the lyrics. Rap music usually is portrayed very violently, usually talking about drug abuse, stealing, sex, and sometimes even murder,…

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    Some kids live and breathe for animals, and that was always me. My first word was “bullet ant,” or so the story goes. By the time I sussed I was a human being and not some weird sea lion, I was four. At zoos I actually asked my mom to read the information panels and sat there, thumb in mouth, while she sounded out tongue-twisters like “chances lupus.” I had my collection of stuffed animals, my copy of Amphibians of the Americas, and my career goals. I was going to be a vet, James Elliot-style.…

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    “Why Won’t They Talk To Me?” A Groovy Semiotic Analysis The spaced out and complex tunes of psychedelic rock born in the 1960’s by numerous artists ranging from The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, The Byrds, Pink Floyd, The Doors, and more have evolved over the years into a mix of antique guitar and present-day disco pop. The discourse community of psychedelic rock which arose in the 1960’s is still alive and evolving today while holding the same values of peace, love, and sharing the love for music…

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    Throughout history the US media has unfairly portrayed psychedelic drugs, the counterculture, and philosophies behind them. Psychedelic drugs have been not only misportrayed and lied about, but the work of many successful scientists has been ignored because of the bad stigma behind psychedelic drugs. We will explore how psychedelic drugs can benefit society and help many people. Only until the psychedelic renaissance, present day, has some of the media started seeing psychedelic culture for what…

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    During the 1960s, the introduction and popular recreational use of LSD created new forms of rock music. This music was referred to as acid or psychedelic rock, and some of the important players in this industry included the Grateful Dead and the Doors. As the counterculture movement ended, the popular music genres changed. The music shifted from the intense rock music to more calming forms to meet the needs of the post-counterculture age. More personal, established music became more popular.…

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    early to mid 1960s. The second song he played was by The Gladys Knight and The Pips. This slower song was called “The Best Thing That Ever Happened To Me” and it is from the Motown/R&B genre. He explained to me that this genre is known for having making a huge impact regarding the Civil Rights Movement. The third genre he played was The Surf Rock and Psychedelic Rock genre. This music, being mostly instrumental or dance music, became extremely popular in the early to mid 1960s as well. He played…

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