Counterculture

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    There were many changes during the 1960s due to the Counterculture. It was a time where ideas, clothing, issues, music, and philosophy changed. The counterculture lasted from 1964- 1972. The Counterculture movement was mostly created by young adults and college students. During this time period new groups of organizations and people were made, one group that stood out the most were called Hippies. They had the biggest impact on the Counterculture movement. They were created a little after the Counterculture started. The Counterculture was a period where culture and the ideal lifestyle was changed, people began to explore personal and get involved with political ideas.(A Culture history of the united states) This started with young college…

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    The counterculture movement of the 1960s reflected an American society that was self-serving and un-patriotic to some, but to others, it was a reflection of a liberating and pleasure-seeking America. There were clear distinctions at this time between the “old” and the “new”. Baby boomers rejected the cultural standards of their parents because they wanted to pursue their own versions of happiness, but their parents’ generation believed that they were destroying the democratic ideals that…

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    The phrase “hippie” has been widely used as a derogatory term that describes individuals who are drug addicts, unwilling to obey authority, and are unpatriotic towards their country. In the book Hippies A to Z by Skip Stone describes what the common characteristics that a “hippie” stands for and how the “hippies” were very passionate about opening the debate to many specific issues that were important to the hippie counter cultural movement. Stone establishes in the first chapter that those who…

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    The hippie movement was the common title Americans used to define the out casted individuals and their actions that began to take place in the early 1960s and continued on through the 1970s. The movement started as vocal opposition to the United States taking part in the Vietnam War. Soon after, this generation ultimately transformed into a liberal counterculture. A counterculture is a subculture that has values and behavioral norms that are substantially different from those of the mainstream…

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    Dippy Hippie I am describing Dippy Hippie from Max the Mighty. Dippy Hippie is an older guy with gray hair with two braided pigtails. He’s chubby with a bright smile. He has a large nose, but not lots of chin. He wears a Hawaiian shirt and glasses with lenses thick and round. I know this, because on page #40, I read “He’s this old dude with silvery white braided hair into pigtails and a huge lumpy nose and not much chin. He’s got a big wide smile and a Santa Claus fat belly, and he’s wearing a…

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    Hairspray Countercultures

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    Racial segregation was plainly represented in the movie in a rather appropriate manner. For example, during a scene in which Blacks and Whites are dancing in organized choreography, the audience witnesses the physical partition of the two groups using a velvet rope. The separation of races is seen throughout the movie, which is deemed perfectly normal to all but Tracy Turnblad. This shows that this issue fairly and accurately portrayed. The actions that Tracy and her youthful friends took when…

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    political groups of the counterculture movement, the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and the Yippies, were crucial to the political development during the counterculture movement. Despite the important involvement of these groups during the time period, their impacts were fairly minimal. The SDS saw issues with its purely student demographic. After the 1960s, the SDS had split into a bunch of small individualized groups, leading to the end if the group as a whole. The Yippies on the…

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    as, “The Counterculture”…

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    Counterculture Movement

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    change was brewing. However, unbeknownst to American society, this flicker would emerge into an immense flame that ignited passion, controversy, and most of all, change. These three words could be described as the ultimate mantra for the decade of the nineteen sixties. From nineteen sixty to the end of the decade, America witnessed tremendous economic, social, and political development. The conflicts in this turbulent stage included ones between races, sexes, social classes, and generations. Six…

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    They were also the biggest group to contribute to the counterculture. “The cry of the baby was heard across the land,” as historian Landon Jones later described the trend (Baby Boomers). More babies were born in 1946 than ever before. A total of 3.4 million babies were born, 20% more than in 1945 (Baby Boomers). This marked the beginning of the baby boom. As soldiers were returning from war they wanted nothing more than stability. When they got back home the four main things they looked for…

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