Mozart effect

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    The Mozart Effect

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    Music has recently become a new source of interest in both neuroscience and psychology. Researchers have begun to study the effects on everything from behavior to stress and human cognition. Over 93 percent of Americans listen to music (Everyone). On average, Americans listen to twenty-five hours of music a week (Everyone). Music stimulates different parts of the brain, including the temporal and frontal lobes, which effects cognition. The definition of cognition is "conscious mental activities such as thinking, understanding, learning and remembering"(Merriam-Webster). The question that the public is asking now is: does listening to music make people smarter? While some people respond differently to listening to music, the overall effects…

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    Mozart Effect

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    experiment to understand the effects of Mozart on college students. The test included thirty-six students who took the spatial IQ test twice one in silence and the other after listening to Mozart’s “Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major” (K.448). The pilot study concluded that the undergraduates scored eight to nine points higher and “that the relationship between music and spatial reasoning was so strong that simply listening to music can make a difference” (Campbell 15). Rauscher notes that the…

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    Mozart Effect Analysis

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    articles focus on neurological development. Prodigies, particularly in music seem to Fascinate Dr Jenkins Jenkins. In Jenkins article, "The Mozart Effect", he analyzes the original study and contrasting views on its effect. He addressed localization of musical perception, long term effects of music on the brain, and the Mozart Effect on epilepsy. The author's purpose is to project further study of the Mozart effect on brain stimulation. Jenkins uses ethos and logos to educate physicians and…

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    Essay On Mozart Effect

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    Most people know Mozart as a great composer, who was involved with music from a very young age. Not only was he able to compose and play music at a very young age, his music was well-known and people asked him to compose pieces for specific events. His music was special and left people wanting to hear more. Throughout his short lifetime, he was able to compose a multitude of magnificent pieces that are still in use today. Not only is his music still in use today, but it also has a special…

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    A STUDY ON HOW MOZART’S CLASSICAL MUSIC COULD AFFECT TO BOOST STUDENT’S SPIRIT WHILE DOING HOMEWORK. 1. INTRODUCTION Classical music could divide into major time divisions into the early music period, which includes the Medieval (500-1400) and the Renaissance eras (1400-1600). Next, common practice period, which includes the Baroque (1600-1750), Classical (1750-1830), and Romantic eras (1804-1910). A well-known otolaryngologist from France, Dr. Alfred A. Tomatis had started the study on…

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    Beauvais, Clémentine. 2015. "The ‘Mozart Effect’: A Sociological Reappraisal." Cultural Sociology 9 (2): 185-202. doi:10.1177/1749975514557096. http://resolver.scholarsportal.info/resolve/17499755/v09i0002/185_teasr. Beauvais argues that the ‘Mozart Effect’ was a successful sociocultural phenomenon because of its many varying components and factors. Beauvais discusses the many ways in which the “effect” took the world by storm, and along with it, the falseness of the “effect.” Beauvais…

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    The Mozart Effect Essay

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    The Mozart Effect, which was developed by Dr. Gordon Shaw, is a theory that listening to classical music will make you smarter. Dr. Shaw’s studies have shown that listening to classical music like Mozart’s Sonata in D major for Two Pianos resulted in higher IQ test scores. When the students listened to classical music for just a few minutes prior to the test, their scores increased by as much as nine points. Dr. Shaw also tested his theory on children as well. He took a group of preschool aged…

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    Mozart Effect Essay

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    one benchmark that can potentially aid in creative thinking and cognitive skills. Thus far, the effects of music on attention, verbal, and visual memory that has been explored in the previously mentioned experiments, and spatial processing skills with music were investigated in the study that led to the advent of the “Mozart effect”. All of these experiments should be redone where the subjects themselves are able to select the music being listened to, which could yield different results in the…

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    Homework Music Benefits

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    It depends on what kind of music and what kind of subject. Researchers like Stanford University Professor, Clifford Nass have stated,“Music with lyrics is very likely to have a problematic effect when you’re writing or reading. Probably less of an effect on Math, if you’re not using the language parts of your brain,” (Goodwin 11). Yes I do agree with what the professor said. The song can and will interfere with your brains thinking when its trying to process the words you are trying to read and…

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    client be oriented to reality and that he possess a modicum of self-organization. Singing together provides a way that clients of diverse functioning levels can have a unified experience, thus facilitating group cohesion. Mental health professionals have seen the benefits of music in their practice. Some of the benefits include; meaningful associations, self-organization, group cohesion and unified experience for those of all levels, could music have the same benefits in the classroom?…

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