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    American Indian Traditions

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    The United States of America has a long American Indian history. These people were the first people to inhabit the new world or the Western Hemisphere of the Earth. South Dakota is the current home of the Sioux Nation tribe. South Dakota has ten reservations located in our state, one that covers part of Nebraska (Johnston, n.d., para. 4). South Dakota is one of the many states where American Indian traditions are still celebrated. Through all the struggles and the triumphant Sioux pride has remained. Luther Standing Bear wrote the book My People the Sioux to show how his life was changed through assimilation. Although American Indian’s way of life has changed over the years, their spirit has not been broken. The largest change in American…

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    Asian Indians, East Indians and Indo-Americans are all the same culture, they are Indians. They have an interesting economic history with the United States. Asian Indians have attained some of the highest educational levels of all ethnic groups of Asian descent. Their family and religion have a desire to maintain traditional values of Hinduism. They are one of the oldest civilizations that continue to flourish in the present day. Social History in the US Asian Indians have been migrating to…

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    American Indians

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    that there are two million American Indians in the United States (US), and they make up about one percent of the entire inhabitants, hence American Indians are predicted to expand by forty-four percent to three and a ½ million by 2020. People who also categorize themselves as Hispanic or multicultural are included in the projected four million American Indians in the US, making up One and a ½ percent of the US population (Evans-Campbell et al, 2002). American Indians are not a consistent cluster…

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    Native American people from police harassment. This was the when the foundation of the American Indian Movement began. The main aim of the American Indian Movement was to bring attention to the discriminations against Native Americans. The members of the American Indian movement wanted to change the perception of Native American people. If more attention was brought to Native Americans, such as media then that offered a piece of protection to those Native Americans. Another aim of the American…

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    Native American Indians did not have a concept of land as a commodity or a possession like the European, Colonist, or Americans. The Native American Indians signed many treaties giving land in order to maintain the balance between a conquering force and providing for their own people. The relationship between the European settlers brought many things to trade with the Indians such as axes, guns, knives, alcohol but the most devastating item that the Indians received were the germs that their…

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    American Indians Roles

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    discussing the American West, one cannot carry on a conversation without mentioning the Native Americans. They played many roles throughout American history. In the west they played several. American Indians opened up the west by helping explorers, elevated the horse in their culture to an iconic status, changed the ecological balance in many places throughout the west, proved to the U.S. and Mexico that they were a force to be reckoned with. First, the Native Americans played an important role…

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    American Indian Culture

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    Many myths and realities about American Indian life prevailed in the late nineteenth century following the period of modernization and Americanization. Americanization mainly refers to the process in which individuals become assimilated into American culture and customs while also still practicing other ethnic traditions. This process prevailed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as more immigrants traveled to the United States for work or to evade harsh governmental control.…

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    American Indian Genocide

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    The extermination of American Indians has always been a sensitive issue. The massive depopulation of the Indigenous peoples in the Americas after 1492 to the Removal Era (1830-1950’s) seems like a clear-cut case of the genocide. Some believe that the United States’ action towards Indians was deplorable but never genocidal in certain areas. Many believe that California Indians were the victims of genocide from the Anglo Americans and Spanish. Yet, the genocide of Indians east of the Mississippi…

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    David Mitchell, an English novelist once said, “All revolutions are, until they happen, then they are historical inevitabilities.” This quote best describes the situation during both the American and Indian revolutions. The American and Indian Revolutions achieved independence from Great Britain for many reasons. The British involvement in both countries were different in the way they drove the start of the revolution, and the actual war of independence was developed by the different ideology of…

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    American Indians are too often overlooked. Whether it be lack of representation, or excess oppression, the American Indian Movement known as AIM was created to attempt to raise awareness, and protect American Indians. This movement began in 1969 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by Dennis Banks, George Mitchell, George Mellessey, Herb Powless, Clyde Bellecourt, Vernon Bellecourt, Harold Goodsky, Eddie Benton-Banai. Who had all witnessed prejudice and abuse from Law Enforcement, and noticed that crimes…

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