Hardboiled

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    In the Maltese Falcon, Hammett builds a detective through the genre of hardboiled fiction and his writing style. Like a boiled egg that has lost all softness. “The writing style is gritty and tough.”(the big read). In the writing a hard boiled detective is a “man at odds with society, whose motivation stems not from monetary reward but from a personal code and the search for truth.”Throughout the novel, Spade’s definition of a detective comes to be a hardboiled hero that isn’t afraid to use violence to seek the truth and corruption to bring about justice. This genre thoroughly develops Spade’s definition of a detective through his “violence and corruption”; while also showing his unwavering personal code of justice as detective. Through Spade’s hard boiled personality, he is defined by his harsh actions and use of corruption to finish solving a case. One of Spade’s harsh decisions was made during the situation when he had to find the lost $1,000. He risked losing Brigid's trust and affection for him and“Made Brigid strip search for the $1,000 dollars because he didn’t trust her."I did not take that bill, Sam." said brigid. Spade responded "but I've got to know. Take your clothes off."(pg 110 Hammett). Although he had been affectionate to Brigid, As a detective he was only using her…

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    work. First, what is a femme fatale? In Criminal Femmes Fatales in American Hardboiled Crime Fiction, Maysaa…

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    The hard-boiled detective, in noir tradition, is typically depicted as a lone wolf figure, one that upholds morality while balancing the corruption inherent in his line of work. He could be defined by his sexual potency, just as much as by his denial of pleasure. Raymond Chandler, in his 1950 essay, The Simple Art of Murder, outlines this archetype, with an authority appropriate to his foundational authorship. Chandler writes, “He talks as the man of his age talks, that is, with rude wit, a…

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    “Private Eye” or tough “Hard-boiled” private investigator detective fiction is the classification most dominated by American writers (Mansfield-Kelly 205). One of the founders and innovators of the private investigator is Dashiell Hammett. And is also “The most influential figure in the structuring of hard-boiled detective fiction,” (Mansfield-Kelly 229). He wrote the first tough-guy detective in “The Gutting of Couffignal”, named Continental OP and wrote The Maltese Falcon (Mansfield-Kelly…

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    In the novel The Big Sleep the narrator shows the corruption that surfaces in Los Angeles and the modern world in general. Reveals issues that include wealth and class, exploitation and corruption play out in The Big Sleep. “Sean McCann has argued that hard-boiled fiction is fundamentally a parable about the economic crisis of the day (i.e the Depression and the New Deal). Specifically he argues: The Big Sleep is an allegory of economic predation in which the vernacular energy of the white preys…

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    The crime drama ‘Heat’ (Mann) tells the story of a criminal, Neil, and a cop, Vincent. One is content, calm, and has a budding love interest. The other is unhappy, brash, and is at the end of his third marriage. In any other movie, the first description would characterize Vincent and the second would represent Neil. ‘Heat’ flips these roles and makes the criminal behave like a cop and the cop act criminal. Michael Mann, the director of ‘Heat’, chooses to portray these characters as opposites to…

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    Raymond Chandler’s The High Window introduces Philip Marlowe as a private detective. Mrs. Murdock is in need of a private detective, and she heard Marlowe can get the job done. He is hired and his duty is to find Mrs. Murdock’s daughter-in-law, Linda, without anyone getting arrested. Linda has stolen one of the valuable coins that Mrs. Murdock’s deceased husband collected. Already the suspicion starts when Marlowe senses that Mrs. Murdock is not telling him the entire story; she doesn’t want her…

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    After the Great Depression period, people needed a new beginning. The United States experienced a rise of prosperity where big cities such as Los Angeles were in the center. The American Dream was revitalized. In the late 1930s, the hard-boiled novel became increasingly popular, but when hard-boiled novels were later adapted as films, the films were regarded as works of Noir. The term Noir was adapted by French critics because the films featured techniques such as black and white coloring and…

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    Women In Detective Fiction

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    Just like the world we live in today, detective fiction is a male dominated genre. Detectives are usually white males who solve dangerous crimes such as murder. If women are involved, they are usually characterized as damsels in distress or femme fatales. It is a man’s world; therefore, it is the sole responsibility of men to be the protectors. For centuries, we have lived in a patriarchal society and this mindset has influenced this genre significantly. Men are deemed better detectives because…

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    Film Noir started when American film change its context to a much darker subject matter due to the aftermath of World War II. Based from the article of Christopher McColm, McColm gathers information to review the book “Blackout: World War II and the origins of Film Noir” whose author is Sheri Chinen Biesen. In the book, Biesen argues that the term noir emerged during the war era. Noir authors used the concept of post-war American angst to relay to the audience that noir fiction tends to…

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