Eminent domain

Sort By:
Decent Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Amazing Essays
Best Essays
    Page 1 of 18 - About 176 Essays
  • Amazing Essays

    Essay On Eminent Domain

    • 1276 Words
    • 6 Pages

    (Williams). Or so that is what the modern people of the U.S thought. Eminent domain was one of the first powers given to the government from the Fifth Amendment. Even though it was one of the first powers that was given to the government, it has become one of the most abused recently in numerous court cases. The vast majority of them end with the government winning with a rebuttal stating that no one can take property without due process of law or just compensation. Even in the past, the U.S government has used eminent domain to acquire property to create roads, accommodate the military, and obtain various goods, sometimes even without giving just compensation to the owner.…

    • 1276 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Amazing Essays
  • Good Essays

    Eminent Domain is a legal act in which the government can purchase private property without the consent of the land owner if the government declares it is to meet a public need. Usually the government used this power to build road, urban renewal or public works projects. The government’s ability to use eminent domain comes from exercising their police power from the Fifth Amendment. The U.S. Constitution requires the government to provide compensation to the owner when their private property is…

    • 545 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Eminent domain is a public policy issue that has been around for centuries. As long as government can exercise its power, eminent domain has been a debated topic. In most cases, eminent domain is used to provide essential public goods while in other cases it has been used against private entities. Normally, when a unit of government wants to acquire private property the government attempts to negotiate the purchase of the property for fair value. If the landowner does not want to sell, the…

    • 299 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Good Essays

    Eminent Domain

    • 621 Words
    • 3 Pages

    controversy associated with eminent domain. In short, the case was a hearing between the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority and the counsel representing Vera Coking. Trump attempted to take over Coking’s property to expand his casino by building a limo waiting area. When appealing to the CRDA, they offered her a mere two hundred fifty thousand for land that a previous developer offered her a million for. Although eminent domain was used as defense for the CRDA, the courts ultimately ruled…

    • 621 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Eminent Domain Essay

    • 538 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Eminent domain is an idea that dates all the way back to the 1100s in Europe.(Reynolds) It is the power of the government entities to take private or public property for public use. (Ashley) The meaning of public use has been attempted by the courts but has never been determined by law. Court decisions for specific purposes may or may not be used for other circumstances. Legislation at the Federal level does not cover eminent domain as related to all property matters. Some states have passed…

    • 538 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Persuasive Speech Pipeline

    • 1039 Words
    • 4 Pages

    This will take money away from the farmer and our agricultural industry, a major part of our economy. The pipeline only runs through our state, and there isn’t a continuous income that will come from it. Transition: Our economy is very important in the progress of our state and communities, and the pipeline could help and hurt it. According to the New Oxford American Dictionary dictionary, eminent domain is the right of a government or its agent to expropriate private property for public use,…

    • 1039 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Amazing Essays

    In the Kelo v. New London court case, Suzette Kelo and eight petitioners opposed a eminent domain taking “projected to create in excess of 1,000 jobs, to increase tax and other revenues, and to revitalize an economically distressed city” (“Kelo” 472). Suzette Kelo claimed the “extensive improvements” that she had made on her house justified her ability to block this development plan (476). Others claimed that their “investment properties,” because they were not “blighted or otherwise in poor…

    • 1151 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Amazing Essays
  • Good Essays

    Facts of Prime Coastal Private Real Property in Wilmington, North Carolina The non-profit company promoting coastal redevelopment under Tar Heel Family Resort is using Wilmington’s power of eminent domain and visa versa for mutual benefits. Seizure, without prior offer to you, the owner, exhibits zero attention to the owner’s interest. I agree the fact that it is (was) your (future) home means it ought to hold all definitions of home. No deed stipulates how many times one has to be at their…

    • 732 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    When the Fifth Amendment was passed in the United States, part of its function was to give the government the power of eminent domain. The power of allows them to take an individual’s private property in return for “just compensation” for “public use” with the intent to better off a community. This could mean that a plot of land could be seized by the government with plans to become a road or a canal. In those cases, the government would be turning a private plot of land into a “public use” in…

    • 728 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    According to Pearce (2007), following the case of Kelo v. New London (2005), North Carolina lawmakers added a provision in the state’s eminent domain laws intended to limit the extent to which the state or city can seize private property. Under this provision, eminent domain can only be used to take individual parcels of land that are deemed to be blighted or dilapidated. The provision also includes a specific definition of what meets these criteria (p. 1790). This is important in Martin’s case…

    • 1203 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Previous
    Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 18