Elegiac couplet

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    The poem is written as one continuous stream of consciousness, as though this is what depression feels like. The changing of ideas within the single stanza shows the reader how Thomas must have been feeling at the time of writing this. The poem also contains a rhyme scheme. The single stanza contains rhyming couplets throughout. However, Thomas, through the use of punctuation does not allow the reader to read the poem in the traditional way rhyming couplets allow the reader to be read. As rhyming couplets are traditionally associated with happy and upbeat poems this contradicts the tone of what Thomas is trying to explain. However, by not allowing the reader to read the poem in the traditional way, it leaves the reader reading it in a much more staggered way, which could reflect Thomas ' desire to be happy but his inability to know how to become that. It presents to the reader a sense of confusion about what he wants and what he wishes, as the poem reflects this too. Overall the poem reflects Thomas 's deep depression and perhaps reflects his desire to be happy again. He contradicts himself slightly by talking about nature, positively, and says…

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    Helen Keller, then ten years old, a letter expressing her gratitude that Whittier’s poems had ‘made her joyful all the day long because her mind could see all the lovely things which she could not see with her eyes’” (Maskal 138). He inspired so many with his poems and one of which is “Don’t Quit”. This poem is narrated in Apostrophe format, has a couplet rhyme scheme, has a specific diction choice, impacts readers, and can reach all kinds of people. John Greenleaf Whittier has had experience…

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    The theme of "O Captain! My Captain!" is that sacrifices have to be made in order to be successful and gain greatness. Elegy: somber toned poem, lament for the dead This poem is an Elegy in honor of Abraham Lincoln. Walt Whitman wrote this poem a little after Lincoln's assassination. This poem is a big metaphor because it is about a captain -Abraham Lincoln- and his crew -Lincoln's followers- obtaining their sought out prize-winning the civil war- but after getting what they want the captain…

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    It has three lines for each stanza and the rhyming scheme is ABA, ABA. I was a little hungry here, so it influenced my writing. I wanted detail and visuals, but tongue in cheek. There are a lot of sensory details in this poem, which is the literary term I used for this. Vows Do you say “I do”? Yes, I do, I do, I do Bless you! This poem is a modern haiku with the syllables, 5 7 2. I came up with this one when I was falling asleep, and I think it’s pretty funny. True Identity I look like…

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    Ironically, when Byron insults “the four first rhymes” and begs “take them not for mine” he is disparaging the rhymes of his own stanza as well. The Ottava Rima is consequently an expectation and a denial of the content contained within a signal form. This combination of two vastly different types of content, the lyrical beginning, and the punchy concluding rhyming couplet, demonstrates Byron’s use of different conventions and his combination of genres to his own egotistical, burlesque…

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    what their child could possibly do besides staring at the television screen, and angrily exclaims “THEY… USED… TO… READ!”(Dahl line 44). In the lines that follow this exclamation by Dahl, he alludes to some fairly famous children's book characters and stories, like “How The Camel Got His Hump” and “How The Monkey Lost His Rump”, providing examples of what children used to read, before the creation of TV. as well as giving parents the strength to ignore “the screams and yells the bites and…

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    perspective of himself and the world around him. Within the introductory heroic couplets of the poem, the stanza “And I must be, as he had been - alone” suggests the greater challenge of loneliness faced by the persona. The use of the caesura within this couplet emphasises the personas emotions within the introductory aspects of the poem, highlighting the key challenge portrayed within the text. As the poem progresses, the persona gains a renewed perspective of himself and the world around him.…

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    rights. In the poem, Claude McKay utilizes a Shakespeare sonnet format along with various metaphors, rhymes and repetition to illustrate Stuart hall’s second argument of various transformations of cultural identity over time by presenting a terrific battle scene. In the poem, " if we must die" McKay borrowed Shakespeare sonnet format for his poem. As a sonnet, this poem has 14 lines and it is divided into four parts. The first three parts are each four lines long, and are known as…

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    The pattern of rhyming couplets continues throughout the lay maintaining the sing-song feel and allowing the reader to follow the lines easily. Furthermore, the lyrical rhyme provides a counterpoint to the horrific imagery presented in the excerpt. The author shows this in the rhyming couplet, “Sum stode withouten hade, / And sum non armes nade” (391-392). While describing people with missing heads and other appendages, the rhyme keeps within the boundaries of a joyous and mystical lay. The…

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    feeling of lasting love is worth any pain or risk. The author uses a specific diction to help the reader relate and actually feel some of the pain, “Fragile my skin, leaving scratches on me.” (Line 7) The author uses words like scratches in contrast to fragile to show how harsh the pursuit is. This also helps people understand the pain and wounds acquired in the search for love by comparing it to the wounds of climbing a mountain. The author’s tone supported the theme as well. The tone begins…

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