Control theory

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    the emergence of control theory challenged these prior theories that dominated criminology by emphasizing the individual and his or her social controls. There are several varieties of control theory, such as Sykes and Matza’s Techniques of Neutralization, Walter Reckless’ Containment Theory, Travis Hirschi’s Social Bond Theory, and Gottfredson and Hirschi’s Self-Control Theory. In this paper, I will focus on Skypes and Matza’s Techniques of Neutralization by presenting the theory, empirical…

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    There are a number of reasons that may play into reasons as to why an individual would want join a gang. Both social control theories and subcultural theories offer different ideas and perspectives. It may be for security, acceptance, unity or even a way to rebel against to the real issue. It’s a method of trying to control a certain situation or circumstance. Social control theory looks at different ways and ideas that influence an individual’s behavior in order to get them to obey a set of…

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    When applied to criminal behavior, social control theory explains what influences criminal behavior. The social control theory also contributes to individual criminal behavior. An informal look at Social control may be to look at social values, community expectations and laws of communities. The social laws or laws governed by society The formal social control describes the social laws, rules, and punishments that address behavior that is considered antisocial or criminal. The first step toward…

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    The concertive control theory tries to explain how power connections or relationships can be changed at the period of team based and alternative form of organisations .There are three concepts that are important in the concertive control theory, the first one is control, there are three types of control, the first one is simple control it has to do with who has the position to direct people in the work place, who has authority in the work place. The second one is technological control which…

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    Self-control theory also known as General theory of crime is a criminological theory about how an individual lacks self-control. Lacking self-control is the main factor behind deviant behavior. Self-control theory places much of its weight on parents’ ability to properly raise their children. It suggests that individuals who were not parented properly before the age of ten develop less self-control than those of roughly the same age who were raised with improved parenting. As simple as this…

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    The next theory is social control theory is also known as social bond theory. Those who ascribe to this school of thought maintain that “all people have the potential to violate the law and that modern society presents many opportunities for illegal activity.” (Siegel, 2011 p.180). Social control theorists believe that there are two reasons that people don’t commit crimes. They either have self-control, or they are committed to conforming to the norms of society. People don’t want to have…

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    Control/Bond Theory (define in your own words): The control theory suggests that feeling connected or disconnected by social relationships, and society as a whole, it affects behaviors in a positive or negative way. Basically, the stronger social relationships you have may contribute to positive results as part of Hirschi's concept of bonds. Key terms/concepts: The attachment bond means that people value the opinions of these others they are attached to and when people feel part of their…

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    In realizing the weaknesses of the control theory during my internship at the VWU, I would have to say that the power and authority that looms over many people’s heads in the court house is strikingly identifiable. The way in which the courthouse runs is what I would call “not user-friendly” to the average person. The parking is obviously set up for the elites (lawyers, judges, advocates, etc.), the “normal” people have to use the parking deck a few blocks away, if we were lucky to get a spot,…

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    This theory essentials blames this on today’s society. Everyone has the ability to violate laws, but ultimately do not due to their morals. They are often afraid that committing crimes will ruin great relationships forever. For example, if a college student is…

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    justice system, are more likely to take charge in their own matters. Therefore, incidents where people become victims of a crime, would sometimes lead to breaking the law in order to get vengeance. Black refers this theory as “The Theory of Self-Help.” In the article, “Crime as Social Control,” by Donald Black, he mentioned how people took the repercussions after a crime occurred to them or someone they cared about. Throughout…

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