Control theory

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    Control theories dictate that individuals conform to what society motivates. Social controls predict whether deviance occurs or not (Reiss, 1951). Control theory focuses on why society conform to deviant behavior, rather than most theories focusing on individuals deviating from social norms. Control theory has been compared to many other theories of criminal behavior. Hirschi and Gottfredson (1990) referred to theories as positivistic. Positivistic theories motivate people to commit crimes. In…

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    Out of all the sociological and psychological theories listed in chapter 2 of our textbook, I think the social control theory has the most merit. The theory is based on four components of social bond. These components are what keep people from committing crimes. The first component is attachment; someone does not commit a crime because they are afraid of being judged by the ones they love, respect, and value. The second is commitment; people do not commit a crime because they put considerable…

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    Gate Control Theory Paper

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    Gate control theory is a great borrowed theory that relates to postoperative pain in the pediatric patient and the nursing education that is associated with it. Another theory that this writer believes also fits in the topic of postoperative pain in pediatric patients and nursing education about the topic is Lazaru’s theory of stress, coping, and adaptation (McEwen & Wills, 2014, p. 320). Stress plays a major role in pain especially after a surgery with pediatric patients, this specific…

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    of self-control you begin to inhibit criminal behavior. The mind is the most powerful asset we have as humans it controls everything our motives, emotions, decisions and when the mind becomes a victim to a disability it causes havoc which usually leads to delinquency. I am relating this specific theory to an article on the topic of mental health care and how we should be attentive and interested in the topic; because it could potentially lead to…

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    Coco's Self-Control Theory

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    Self-Control Theory “explains crimes as the outcome of an individual’s low self-control in combination with situational conditions conductive to criminal behavior” (Glick. Miller. 176). Individuals with low levels of self-control Gottfredson’s and Hirschi states; “crime provides easy and immediate gratification of desires; criminal acts provide few or meager long-term benefits; and criminal acts are exciting, risky, or thrilling” (Glick. Miller 176). Hirschi states that self-control must be…

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    Without overlooking the disparities of Self-Control Theory and the solid association of biological components to the conduct of serial killers, Self-Control Theory is the more congruent theory. At the hypothesis' center, it expresses that wrongdoing is a consequence of inappropriate raising of youth, which is extremely equivalent to the sociological advancement of the serial killer. Self-Control Theory clarifies why a select number of children with inadequate youth maturation with respect to…

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    In Hirschi’s social control theory, he believes that individual differences that develop early in a person’s life have effects across the entire course of their life. Hirschi joined with Criminologist Michael Gottfredson in this belief, and both believe that criminal behavior is gratifying to some and that crime can lead to short-term pleasure. Hirschi and Gottfredson both believe that self-control, not social bonds are largely responsible for why some commit criminal acts (Cullen, Agnew, Wilcox…

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    In control theory, deviant acts are said to result from an individual’s attachment, commitment, involvement, and belief, which it goes on to define (Criminology Theory, 1998, p. 289). Its main concern is attachment, which refers to the social bonds an individual establishes with society, whether they are weak or strong, and how they relate…

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    Control theory concentrates on the elements that limit people from crime. They contend that all individuals have needs and desires that are more effectively fulfilled through crime than through legitimate channels. For instance, it is much less demanding to take cash than to work for it. So according to control theorists, crime requires no extraordinary clarification, and it is frequently the most practical approach to get what one needs. Instead of clarifying why individuals participate in…

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    Continuing on into the next theory, Social Learning theory explains how juveniles can become reinforced through committing delinquent acts by the association with delinquent peers. Studies suggests that there is an increase during the adolescent stage of life in which the juvenile spends more time with peers, increasing the likelihood of peer influence. The importance of peer influence peaks around the age 17, and declines after (National Research Council Staff, 2001). Juveniles can be…

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