Peloponnesian War

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    Greece, its culture, and its people had a major impact on the development of Western civilization. The Greek people made major scholarly advances and became the birthplace of many subjects that are still taught today. Philosophy, medicine, astronomy, and many other contributions to the scientific world brought rise to a new way of thinking and a new way of life. Greece even became the birthplace of federalism, shaping the future of politics. It is not only important to know how Greek advances…

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    Pericles, Athenian statesman of the 5th century B.C., whose name is closely associated with the great age of Athenian democracy and culture, the Athenian Empire, and the Peloponnesian War. He was born about 495 B.C., son of Xanthippus, a well-known political figure during the period of the Persian Wars, and Agariste, of the Alcmeonid family, one of the most prominent in Athens. Although little is known of his youth, two men seem to have played an important role in his education: Damon,…

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    Greed In Ancient Greece

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    In the famous words of one Allan Poe E., ‘the glory that was once Greece’ did not live for as long many would have expected it to. In fact, mighty Greece only survived for a short while and remained confined to a geographically minute area. As of the 5th Century BC, mighty Greece was primarily Athens. The state as a whole was Attica but Athens was its driving force at the time. To many, Athens was the “eye” of Greece based on it being a rich artistic hub and highly democratic (Brody et al.,…

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    they won’t be opposed so they can act self-interestedly. Thrasymachus, in Thucydides’ accounts on the Peloponnesian war explains this point of view best by stating, “Justice is nothing other the advantage of the stronger.” (Plato pg. 14). Although violence places fear in your enemies or subordinates, it leads to dismal consequences. The characters of Thucydides accounts on the Peloponnesian war, Plato’s Republic, and Sophocles Antigone demonstrate the use of force to ensure one’s position of…

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    To students just embarking on the study of Greek history and historians alike, It might seem absurd to pose the question of whether the great city of Athens was the leading promoter of democracy in the rest of the Greek city-states during the 4th and 5th centuries. After all, the majority of personal accounts of Greece in that period allege that the Athenian empire was the first to advocate for the establishment of democracy. However, we find little to no concrete confirmation of this widely…

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    Socrates. Socrates’ first offense is the corruption of the youth in Athenian culture. Socrates is guilty on this offense because of the way he treated and “taught” the young men. He told them to dress as Spartans and go against Athens at a time of war. His students, “... acted as if they were drunk…” (Nardo 9) He is explaining the effects that Socrates has had on his students and that they will do most anything he does. When Socrates does these things the…

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    Pericles was the “ruler” of Athens. But Lycurgus did help his society by creating a senate that he was a part of. Not only were they’re personalities different, but the belonged to rival civilizations. Athens and Sparta engaged in a war, called the “Peloponnesian War”. In the end of all the fighting, Sparta won, but both sides suffered heavy casualties. In Bill Thayer’s “Ancient Customs of the Spartans”, Plutarch writes that Lycurgus “banned foreigners from the country” so that “the foreigners…

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    Greek Federalism Analysis

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    As the Greek people began to experiment with new political organization after the end of the Peloponnesian War, a type of federalism emerged that united groups of Greek settlements in several geographic areas including Messenia, Boeotia, and Thessaly. These federations, along with the remaining independent poleis and the rest of Greece, soon encountered a new issue resulting from the rise of Philip of Macedon to the north. While federalism was certainly a civilizational advancement for the…

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    Cyrus The Great Conquerors

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    more motivated compared to the Persians because if they lost, they would lose their independence as well. Although they were still one of the biggest nations of the time, the Persian Empire slowly lost their power and influence after the Greco-Persian war. After their defeat, the Persians were unable to expand their nation any further. They were not able to conquer Greece and weren’t even allowed to continue ruling Ionia and the Aegean…

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    Athens, Greece, was considered a cultural, political, and philosophical hub of the known world during the Classical Period of Greece, which stemmed from 508 BC-322 BC. Several notable Philosophers rose to fame and notoriety in this time period, including Socrates, one of the founders of modern western philosophy. Socrates was born in 470 BC and would go on to have several notable students, including Plato, who was born in 428 BC. Socrates frequently found himself to be a lightning rod for…

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