Peloponnesian War

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    Women In Lysistrata

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    it upon themselves to end the Peloponnesian War. Lead by the titular character Lysistrata, women from both sides of the war agree to abstain from having sexual relations with their husbands to have the men cease fighting. In the end men from both sides, in obvious and extreme sexual frustration, agree to end the war and return home with their wives. Although Lysistrata is a comedic play, it was written in a time of deep-conflict and offers an insight on how the long war affected both sexes.…

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    there military. Military success became an issue when relationships were started through military power. Athens was in control of international trade and the Delian League, well this power led to tensions with Sparta (C, pg. 156). During the Peloponnesian War, when people didn’t choose a side Athens would kill them (C, pg. 156). Even though Athens had such power and control it failed and Sparta became…

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    Lysistrata Analysis

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    Around the year 400 BC, Aristophanes wrote the comedic play Lysistrata to convince Athenians to stop the Peloponnesian War against Sparta. The main protagonist, Lysistrata, is a brilliant Athenian woman who rallies a sex strike within Athens and Sparta in order to force a peace treaty between the two city-states. In addition to incorporating sexuality as a comedic element in his play, which the Greeks embraced as a natural side of humanity, Aristophanes also utilizes the elements: dramatic irony…

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    Thucydides offers a comprehensive analysis of the formation of early Greek cities during ancient times in the Peloponnesian War. His depiction portrays early Greeks as barbaric and simplistic freeloaders, who often pillaged each other to fulfill their own callow self-interest. According to Thucydides, they came together to develop cities out of a desire for safety without the turbulence of conflict. In The Republic, Glaucon paints a similar vision of politics in his speech to Socrates about the…

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    acted as a single body (see Persian wars). Each of the cities of ancient Greece (those of a certain prominence) wanted to play a bigger role in the arena of Greek politics. The most famous were Athens, Sparta, and Thebe. But it was for Athens to carry the flag of excellence in art, politics, spirituality and even war. Most of the representative figures of antique classical culture (before Roman classicism) were Athenian. In the Vth century, after the Persian wars, there were in Greece two major…

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    Pericles was an influential greek statesman, public speaker, and general of athens during the golden age. Pericles as a child was very quiet and introverted and devoted most of his time to his studies . He also received an exceptional education in music from Damon and math in under theoretical physicist Zeno of Elea. Pericle’s Legacy also included many achievements. Pericles was an introvert and took his studies very seriously. He was born around 493 BC into a rich aristocratic family. Pericles…

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    Athenians would use their superiority in long-distance offensive weaponry - the naval forces of the Delian Leagueto destroy Spartan control over the Peloponnesian League. The majority in the Athenian assembly, for their part, resented Spartan interference in their freedom of action” (Martin, Thomas R, 2002. Pg. 151). The results of the First Peloponessian War would form a environment that would put the same enemies as people that had to work together to resolve issues. The Athens would be…

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    Pericles Funeral Oration

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    The ending of the first year in the Peloponnesian War sparked one of ancient Greece’s greatest works, Pericles’s funeral oration. It was written in tribute to the deceased soldiers as encouragement for their families; however, the underlying message is more politically-centered as well as praises for Athens. While he had decent military tactics, he was opinionated, which shows through in his famous speech. Based on Pericles’s opinions about use of wealth, class equality, and gender distinction…

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    Sparta Swot Analysis

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    identifies how and why their strategies changed and explains why the Spartans were best able to adapt their strategy as the realities, risks and the length of the war changed. The initial strategy of the Athenians was to outlast the enemy. Pericles, the primary architect, revealed the Athenian strategy when delivered an insightful speech before the war. In it, he decreed, that Athens should make no concessions to the Spartans except as provided by the treaty, and that a firm refusal of…

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    Lysistrata Themes

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    political views about the war and challenges the views of war among his audience. One in which, “Lysistrata” he delineates his views on the Peloponnesian War. Aristophanes uses his style of feminism and the nature of sex to portray how he viewed the well-being of the war and the effects on the people, in particular women. At the beginning of the play women are most closely portrayed as inferior and weak. Specifically when Lysistrata brings them together to take an action to stop the war between…

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