Organ transplant

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    An organ donation is defined as a transplant that can be a surgical or nonsurgical procedure that takes an organ from a donor and replaces the damaged or failing organ with a new one, but it is much more than that (Ethics of Organ Transplantation 5). An organ donation allows someone another chance at life (The Gift of a Lifetime 1). For someone to be able to receive an organ transplant, he has to be put on the organ donation list. Patients are first evaluated by a physician from a hospital that…

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    Xenotransplantation Essay

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    Linda Griffith etal (2002) states that tissue engineering exploits living cells to restore tissues and organs through transplantation. Organ transplantation can improve the quality of life of patients with organ failure (Herman Waldmann,1999). According to Arthur Caplan (1983) the transplantation of organs with the aid of immunosuppressive drugs has been successful over the years for bone marrow, hearts, livers, lungs, pancreases and spleens for example. To improve the donor pool, proposals can…

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    Researchers manipulate stem cells to treat common diseases by carrying out stem cell transplants. These transplants, also known as bone marrow transplants, infuse healthy stem cells into the patient’s body to replace damaged or disease ridden ones. The stem cells can come from the patient, a relative of the patient (related transplant), or an unrelated donor who’s stem cells are compatible with the patient (unrelated transplant). The stem cells that are…

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    Organ Donation Debate

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    people waiting for an organ transplant, with only 30,000 organ donors available in the United States (“Data”). Consequently, organ procurement organizations, which collect and distribute donated organs, are under intense pressure to increase the frequency and availability of these donations. Unfortunately, many patients waiting for a transplant will die before ever receiving one. This has inspired discussions that question whether the nation should explore alternative avenues of organ donation…

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    First heart transplant was performed in 1967 by Dr. Christiaan Barnard. After that roughly 5,000 heart transplants were performed worldwide each year about 2,000 are performed in the United States (7). Some organs can donate when patient is not braindead, such as kidneys and livers, while on the other hand organs like heart, eyes, pancreases and skin cannot donate when patient is alive. A heart transplant is transplant procedure by surgery where the malfunctioning heart or heart related disease…

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    Selling Organs Essay

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    Should selling organs be legal? Have you ever thought about the possibility of selling their own organs for transplantation? The question, of course is wild, but practice shows that from time to time, is in a difficult financial situation of the inhabitants of our country are beginning thinking outloud about using this opportunity to help others and make some money at the same time. About 75,000 Americans are on the waiting list for kidney transplants. But in the coming year, just…

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    Not every patient that suffers from a heart failure is a candidate for a heart transplant. Some patients are sometimes too sick or have other medical issues that will not allow their transplant to be successful. In order to determine whether the patient is a candidate for a heart transplant, their medical condition must meet the requirements of the transplant team. Other tests may also be performed such as: echocardiogram, coronary angiogram or peak VO2 assessment. Echocardiogram measures the…

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    Ethical Organ Donation

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    A Policy Proposal for Ethical Organ Donation It is estimated that there are around one hundred and twenty thousand patients waiting on the national waiting list for an organ transplant. The demand for healthy, fresh, and, new organs is high. “According to the National Health Services Blood and Transplant, more than twenty-two million people have pledged to help others after their death by registering their wishes on the National Organ Donor Register. Despite the high number of registered donors,…

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    Organ supplies are stagnant and scarce. This poses a critical issue. Fortunately with today’s technology, (aside from human transplantation) two major potential solutions have derived: xenotransplantation (the process of replacing human organs with animal organs) and organ engineering or tissue engineering (creating tissues and organs from human cells). Aside from the promising benefits and breakthroughs, these two methods are far from perfect, and although there has been successful cases, there…

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    In the United States, there has been an increase in the number of organ transplants needed over the years, even though there are not enough donated organs to fill that need. This issue has sparked many ideas in the creation of a remedy to the current organ donation shortage. One of the proposed solutions would be to legalize the sale of human organs, which has many issues woven within it. Through history of organ donations, many people have been saved. However, the proposition…

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