Organ transplant

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    Ever since Joseph Murray performed the first successful human organ transplant of a kidney in 1954 [13], organ transplantation has been a widely debated ethical issue. The allocation of scarce medical resources has been the subject of many debates encompassing but not limited to issues regarding moral worth, financial practicality, legal rights, social status and justice. As the number of people added to the transplant waiting lists increase and the number of convicts’ increase, the question…

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    God Squad Case Study

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    Lizzy Melton Dr. Epright Medicine Morality and Culture 19 October, 2016 In this paper I will argue that a traditional God Squad would not consider Rhonda Ryder as a fit recipient for a kidney transplant based on criteria composed of various psychosocial factors. In the popular opinion of a God Squad, Rhonda is not a fit candidate because of her past employment as a prostitute, her history of drug abuse, and her minimal level of contribution to society. Therefore, I claim that the God Squad…

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    Why Is Arthritis Important?

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    TOPIC Every day, more and more people require a new organ. Whether it’s a new lung, heart, kidney, liver, brain or any of the other myriad of minor organs, anyone could need one due to an injury or disease. There is, however, a solution for people in need of an organ. Patients in need of an organ are placed on a wait list for an available organ provided my donors. “Unlike relatively simple tissues such as bones and skin, to give a heart, the donor must be declared brain dead and the family must…

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    the transplantation, implantation, or infusion into a human recipient of either live cells, tissues, or organs from a nonhuman animal source or human body fluids, cells, tissues, or organs that have had ex vivo contact with live nonhuman animal cells, tissues, or organs”. (US Food and Drug Administration [FDA], 1999; FDA, 2001)Through xenotransplantation scientists and doctors aim to increase organ availability by using pig donors. This may sound shocking, but new technological advances mean…

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    and only you. Whenever you need a transplant it is almost hopeless to think that you will live long enough to get a transplant. Therefore, our government needs to step in and set some boundaries regarding organ donation. Not only is the transplant list extremely long, but you could help cure someone or help them get off horrific treatments that are their only options until they can receive a transplant. When someone has diabetes, they can receive a transplant from someone who has a viable…

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    for organs. Satel’s thesis is that donors should get some compensation, or incentives, to persuade more people to donate. Satel’s claim comes from factual data and personal experience. The data given is minimal but strong. At the beginning of Satel’s argument, she explains how the organ supply is parched, and it was hard for her to get a kidney transplant since the black market kidneys are risky and finding a match is not a simple task. Sally’s argument starts when she acknowledges that organ…

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    Morally Advocating in Nursing; Legal, Ethical, and Moral Obligations of the Professional Nurse Nurses routinely find themselves in moral and ethical predicaments. The moral convictions of a nurse may be tested when the family revokes the dying wishes of a patient, or a preterm neonate is denied resuscitation efforts due to organizational policy. The purpose of this paper is to identify the role of the nurse as a moral agent, incorporate skills and values inherent to ethical reasoning, and…

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    the field of technology today is directly for specific uses within the medical field. One such innovation is advancing the technology behind transplanting organs. Transplanting organs is, for lack of a better term, inefficient. Before we had sufficient medical technology, humans had to simply accept the fact that if one or more of their organs were to fail, they were most likely going to die. If you drank too much and your liver failed, you simply had to live the rest of your life doing…

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    ethical issues involved. The ethical issues that are involved include: what the criteria is for lung transplants, how lung transplants work, and what the mental aspect of lung transplant is. The ten literature reviews indicate and contraindicate these ethical issues involved with lung transplantation in CF…

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    Dr. Row Case Analysis

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    inherited condition that had taken away both of her siblings who were patients in our hospital as well. Already showing indications of liver failure, the baby will not survive more than a year without a suitable donor organ. The baby’s parents are unable to help her with a transplant because both of them have milder versions of the condition. Dr. Doe and Dr. Row have suggested solutions to…

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