Argumentated Organ Donation

1490 Words 6 Pages
Imagine laying in a hospital bed, slowly dying, waiting for someone to give you a body part that you are in dire need of. Your life depends on one organ, but you are on a waiting list with thousands of people ahead of you. Every year in the United States, thousands of people die waiting to receive an organ. It is illegal to buy and sell organs in the United States, and people are so desperate for organs they turn to the black market for organs. A new process for organ transplantation is needed in the U.S. so we can increase the amount of organs we have available for people in need and decrease the deaths that happen every day because of the lack of organs. The controversy over whether organ donors should be compensated or not can be summed …show more content…
The NOTA bans the buying and selling of organs. The penalty for breaking this law includes a fine of up to $50,000 and five years in prison (Saberi, Golden 2). The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) is also a part of the National Organ Transplant Act. UNOS is a system used nation wide that matches candidates and the donors. The UAGA controls the use of cadaver organs and provides the guidelines for organ transplantation. Allison Clemmons writes “UAGA provides a standardized method of donating organs and other body parts to medicine via one of two methods: An individual may predesignate his or her body for transplantation or the recipient organization may obtain consent from the closest family member at the time of the donor’s death” (2). Although we have these pieces of legislation, there is still a great lack of organs and the black market, where people buy and sell organs illegally, continues to grow. The UAGA and NOTA have helped shape the organ procurement process, but still has not reduced the shortage of organs (Clemmons …show more content…
Many people are on waiting lists to receive organs, but will not get them because of the lack of donations. In her article, Clemmons says, “In the United States, 79,748 patients await a kidney transplant; 15,771 patients, a liver transplant; 2,807 patients, a heart transplant, and 1,901 patients, a lung transplant” (2). These numbers continue to grow, as do the number of deaths. Gerald Coleman says, “The United Network for Organ Sharing, which oversees transplantation for the federal government, calculates that everyday 17 people die while waiting for a vital organ” (1). The lack of supply has not only lead to many deaths per year, but also a black market for organs. Gary Becker claims that the main reason there is an imbalance between the demand and supply of organs is because the buying and selling of organs is illegal (2). Perhaps the supply would be greater if we did make the buying and selling of organs legal. Some think we should legalize a market for organs so we can increase the supply, and other people believe that donations should be made out of altruistic

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