Martin McGuinness

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    so that is still an overwhelming figure. The 45% of Protestants who didn’t want the agreement because it would mean them sharing power. The Stormont assembly The Stormont assembly was set up with David Trimble (from the UUP) and Seamus Mallon (SDLP) as first and deputy minister. It began to run Northern Ireland in 1999, but in 2002 Trimble resigned, due to a lack of IRA decommissioning, which meant the assembly collapsed after just 3 years and direct rule returned. However at the end of March 2007 the new St. Andrews agreement meant that the assembly was reformed; the new elections meant that the DUP won the most seats with 36 overall, followed with Sinn Fein with 28 seats. The new first and deputy ministers were: Ian Paisley (DUP) and Martin McGuiness. Paisley said: “today we are starting upon the road which I believe will take us to lasting peace in our province.” The two got on so well that they were given the name ‘the chuckle brothers’. Policing Policing in Northern Ireland was highly biased in the sense that 5/6 people in the police force were protestant, therefore it was very unfair towards the catholic population of the country. The Pattern report came in the year 2000. It aimed to introduce not just a new badge and a new name and most importantly the recruitment of more Catholics into the force. The proposal was initially rejected by the unionists and the republicans because it was too British, but a year later the police service of Northern Ireland was formed. On…

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    Martin Satire

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    Martin Martin is an American sitcom that aired for five seasons on Fox from August 27, 1992 to May 1, 1997. Reflecting the rising popularity of the Fox network throughout the 1990s. Set in Detroit, the series stars Martin Lawrence in the role of Martin Payne, a jockey with a girlfriend named Gina Waters. As the series progressed, plotlines saw Martin eventually move on to become the host of the talk show Word on the Street, which aired on the small Detroit public-access television station…

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    The Protestant Reformation occurred in the 16th century, starting in 1517 and ending in 1648. The Protestant Reformation was initially aimed at reforming the beliefs and practices of the Roman Catholic Church. Its religious aspects were added to by ambitious political rulers who wanted to extend their power and control at the expense of the church. The most dramatic of the events that occurred during the Protestant Reformation took place in Germany, although the Protestant Reformation swept…

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    “Having far-reaching political,economic, and social effects, the Reformation became the basis for the founding of Protestantism,one of the three major branches in Christianity”(Britannica,1). Two of its greatest leaders were Martin Luther and John Calvin.Through Luther’s actions and words, he started the movement that reformed certain basic ideas of Christian belief and resulted in the division of Western Christendom between Roman Catholicism and his own, Lutheranism. In France, Calvin was the…

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    20 million dead and one man responsible. That one man would be known as Adolf Hitler, the leader of the Nazi Party. One question arises when discussing the immoral things that this one man did to humanity and that is was Hitler born with the mindset that he had to kill off all those innocent people or was he 100 percent in control of choosing his destiny? This brings up a very controversial issue as many believe that man has the freedom to do what he pleases and to define himself by his own…

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    1.2 Yalom’s model of existential psychotherapy Yalom believed life has arisen from random events, we are finite and we are responsible for our own destiny (Yalom, 2008), and he identified “four ultimate concerns” as the key to all human existence; death, freedom, isolation and meaningless, and stated, “The individual’s confrontation with these facts of life constitutes the content of the existential dynamic conflict” (Yalom, 1980 p. 8). Death is the central part of Yalom’s philosophy, as we are…

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    The crux of Calvin’s “Reply to Sadoleto” focuses on the theological criticisms of Roman Catholicism and the formation of Reformation theology. Calvin argues that the Roman Catholic Church first and foremost silenced the Gospel, which led to the perversion of the four things on which the safety of the church is founded, which are doctrine, discipline, the sacraments, and ceremonies (9). In order to purify these vital elements of the church, the Catholic Church needs to change its perspective on…

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    1.1.1.1 Phenomenology Phenomenology is a research philosophy that is involved with exploring and understanding the lived experience of individuals, through focusing on a particular experiential perspective (Finlay, 2012; Savin-Baden & Major, 2013). The lived experience of an individual is revealed by how one perceives and makes sense of an event, process or object (Finlay, 2012). The approach has its origins in the work of Husserl, who emphasises the importance and relevance of focusing on…

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    Before the Reformation, there was only one kind of Christianity in Western Europe, called Catholic. In 1517, Martin Luther, who was a German monk and professor of theology nailed his 95 theses on the castle door in Wittenberg. The Protestant Reformation, referred simply as the Reformation was the beginning of the division of the churches. It was seen as a challenge to religious authority that went beyond the Catholic Church. This resulted in the separation of Christians into Protestant and…

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    Secularism Vs Kant

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    During the time period of the majority of Kant’s work, the Enlightenment was rampantly spreading throughout Europe. The Enlightenment, a movement based on human reason and a shift away from the previous confines of Christianity, specifically by the Catholic Church which dominated the Dark Ages. Kant himself described that the Enlightenment “does not involve a human concept of a god, or of mysticism, or of spirituality, or of magic, or of a supernatural anything” (Kant, 17enlightenment…

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