Zionism

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    The Effects Of Zionism

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    History is governed by cause and effect. When exploring the cause, it is to understand the effects of a specific action. The effects of Zionism and Arab nationalism have dominated the relations and the balance of power of the Middle East. This question is not only central due to academic necessity, but it is of fundamental importance for the attainment of peace in a region dominated by war, neo-imperialism and gross violations of human rights. Understanding the evolution of Jewish and Arab, through a socio-political nationalism, allows for a more thoughtful understanding. This essay shall argue that Zionism was, to a slight extent, a response to the failure of assimilation, but especially due to the Haskalah, or Jewish Enlightenment, whose…

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    The extent to which the zionism movement is responsible for the present conflict between Israel and Palestine is significant. Zionism is a historic movement which centres around the desire for Jewish independence and a secure homeland in Zion. Palestine is where the land of Zion is located, also known as Jerusalem (Aviv and Shneer, New Jews, pp.4). The period before the zionism movement, the factors that contributed to the emergence of zionism and the aims of the movement have all been crucial…

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    From the inception of Zionism as a political movement, Europeans and Americans have been heavily involved. Although Zionism had been an religious/emotional longing for the Holy Land tied up in Jewish culture since the Diaspora, it did not begin to become widely politicized until the 19th century. (source?) The religious revivalism of the 1700s and the early 1800s led many Americans and Europeans to be brought up on the romanticization of Holy Land, and to the Jews, Palestine had always been that…

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    Zionism Research Paper

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    Zionism, as a concept, was a nationalistic movement that advocated for the return of the Jewish people to their motherland, Israel. It also supported the recommencement of Jewish sovereignty in Israel. From its inception, Zionism advocated for the tangible entitlements and religious interest of the Jews in the land of Israel. Many Jews, mainly from Europe and Yemen, joined Zionism and started migrating to Palestine. This particular movement was also established in order to bring independence to…

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    Palestine and Zionism: The Thin Line between Hatred and Justice In 1947, millions of Palestinians lost their rights to their land. They were wiped off the map, abused in their own homes, and forcibly removed from their country. Children were slaughtered fearlessly, fathers were run over with tanks as they stood guard in front of their homes, and mothers were sexually and mentally assaulted in prisons. A nation once known for its beauty, kindness, and hospitality was entirely destructed and…

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    Zionism is defined as the national movement of the Jewish people to re-establishment and maintain a Jewish State. The word Zionism is derived from the word Zion, which is another name for Jerusalem. The new Jewish state would reclaim all that the Jewish people lost over the years. The movement was founded by Theodor Herzl and Chaim Weizmann, and has received both support and criticism from various nations. Over the years the movement has made significant progress despite the opposition and…

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    Zionism is a complex but simple movement. In its simplest form it calls for a re-establishment of Jewish sovereignty in the Land of Israel, in gathering of the exiles, and liberation of Jews from the anti-Semitic discrimination and persecution that occurred in their Diaspora. In a sense of Jews with their own nation taking care of their own for their own cause. The waters were muddied and the movement took on many ideologies, and had evolved in a dialogue among a plethora of ideologies: General…

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    seem reasonable, as society will always be divided as different motives embody all of us. So therefore, this poses the question of how do these Jewish individuals who have faced this horrific oppression for centuries feel safe again? Although there may be no definitive answer, looking at the establishment of a centralized Judaic “homeland” could lead to reduced universal oppression. Historically speaking, Zionism was a major movement that started in effort to establish a Jewish homeland. The…

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    In the book My Promised Land by Ari Shavit starts off with the chapter at first sight where we meet Shavit’s great grandfather Herbert Bentwich. Bentwich is a very passionate Zionist. Bentwich decides that Jews must settle in their homeland Judea, and so Bentwich led twenty-one Zionist pilgrims to the land of Israel in 1897. This is because anti Semitism was on the rise which was effecting the Jewish people in very negative ways. Jewish people all over were treated as second-class citizens,…

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    Truman recognized the new nation.4 However, how did Israel come to be? And what part did the American Government and people play in this new state? To answer these questions we have to look back to the Balfour Declaration of 1917, the Holocaust, World War II, and the formation of the United Nations. More specifically, we most look at these events leading up to the Partition Resolution with acute detail given to the role of American Jews and how their leadership and collaboration led to the first…

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