The Zionism Movement: Poem Analysis

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Zionism is defined as the national movement of the Jewish people to re-establishment and maintain a Jewish State. The word Zionism is derived from the word Zion, which is another name for Jerusalem. The new Jewish state would reclaim all that the Jewish people lost over the years. The movement was founded by Theodor Herzl and Chaim Weizmann, and has received both support and criticism from various nations. Over the years the movement has made significant progress despite the opposition and resistance the movement has faced. Throughout history the Jewish people have been exiled, enslaved, and become the victim of mass genocide. The twelfth century poem written by Rabbi Judah Halevi depicts the trials and tribulations the Jewish people continually …show more content…
This movement is a reminder of all the Jewish people have lost and a call to take action. The excerpt from Leon Pinsker, expresses the need for the Jewish people to take fate into their own hands. The people have sacrificed their own homeland in hopes of divine intervention in the form of the coming Messiah. While they still hold out hope for the coming Messiah, Pinsker reminds them that they do not know when he will return. Theodore Herzl, one of the founding fathers of the great movement understands the necessity of having a homeland. In the excerpt from the “Jewish State”, Herzl expresses his beliefs the Jewish people need a land of their own, but must accept what they are offered. He asserts …show more content…
The establishment of the State of Israel represents the outstanding progress of the movement. Document eight reveals that the State of Israel not only provides a state of freedom, for the Jewish people, but one of peace and justice. The state of Israel grants the protection of all religions and races, and safeguards the Holy Places of all religions. Despite the overwhelming support of the movement, there are those who oppose it and fear the Jewish people are replacing them. The political cartoon in document six encapsulates the fears of the non-Jewish people of Palestine. The people of Palestine feel that the Jewish people have invaded the region and have gained too much influence. The cartoon depicts a Jewish man eating all of the bread meant to be shared by the people of Palestine and the Jewish people. This is an obvious metaphor for the Jewish people gaining political influence in the region, and the fear that they will erase the already established people of Palestine. Document seven continues to show the hatred expressed by the people of Palestine. In this cartoon a Jewish man who was stabbed by a Nazi sword, stabs a Palestinian man. This cartoon represents the fear that the Jewish people will take their anger out on the people of Palestine as they have been oppressed for years. There is strife between the Jewish and Muslim people of the area as they both see

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