Causes And Significance Of Zionism

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The extent to which the zionism movement is responsible for the present conflict between Israel and Palestine is significant. Zionism is a historic movement which centres around the desire for Jewish independence and a secure homeland in Zion. Palestine is where the land of Zion is located, also known as Jerusalem (Aviv and Shneer, New Jews, pp.4). The period before the zionism movement, the factors that contributed to the emergence of zionism and the aims of the movement have all been crucial in the development of the Israeli and Palestinian conflict in the Holy Land.

Jews were without a homeland for a significant amount of time but there was still a sense of faith during this period. Many Jewish families persisted with their religion and
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The Arab countries were distracted due to their continuious efforts to abolish the Ottoman Empire. In 1917 a major milestone for zionism was declared known as the Baflour declaration, ‘His Majestys Government views with favour the establishment in Palestine of a National Home for the Jewish people’. The prodominant cause of this declaration was Britian attempting to gain allies for the war against Germany (Avineri, “The Roots of Zionism”, 46-61). This was a significant moment for Jewish people because it symbolised the bible prophecy of a homeland and provided encouragement for zionists to keep backing the movement (Brown, “Zionism and Anti-Semitism”, 656-662). Britain was granted a mandate over Palestine in 1923 from the newly established League of Nations and continuied to poccess this control until 1948. The British did bring positive changes to Palestine by improving social and financial framewoerks which had been compromised due to World War One. Palestine under the control of an imperial country thrived and was able to keep up to par with other Middle Eastern countries (Cohen-Hattab, “Zionism, Tourism, and the battle for Palestine”, p.61). Regardless of these changes the increase in Jewish imigrants resulted in backlash from Arabs and Palestinians (Avineri, “The Roots of Zionism”, 46-61). Violence between the Jews and Arabs was extremely common and affected the political, social and economic sphere. Riots were seen as an efficient political message (Cohen-Hattab, “Zionism, Tourism, and the battle for Palestine”, p.61). Between 1882 and 1914 approximately three million jews migrated, a small majority went to Palestine and the rest settled in America. This was partially due to the apperance of anti-semitism from the Tsarist government in Russia. By the mid 1930s the Jewish population had reached one and half million. (Avineri, “The Roots of

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