United States federal immigration and nationality legislation

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    it does not tell the whole-truth of the matter. To determine the validity Emma Lazarus’ Magnum Opus, one must look at the history of those immigrants, and how they have been treated in the United States. The United States has taken form due the cultures and experiences of immigrants from around the world. While the early years of immigration mostly consisted of Irish and English…

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    legacy of immigration and naturalization administration spans more than 100 years (Our history, 2011). Laws passed in the 1880’s implemented three elements to our immigration policies: “(a) restrictions based on personal characteristics, (b) restrictions based on national origin, (c) protection of American labor” (Laque, 2010, p. 5). When the federal government took over immigration in 1891 the Office of Superintendent of Immigration was part of the Treasury Department (Our history, 2011).…

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    The purpose of COPPA is to protect children’s privacy on the Internet as the following: • Child’s first and/or last name • Child’s email address • Child’s Social Security and/or telephone number • Any information that permits someone to contact or identify the child Universal viewers Web sites or online services, and those that have an isolated area for children, must also adhere to COPPA. Even though Web sites must post a privacy policy, parents can apply parental controls on many Web sites,…

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    A second Act that is worth mentioning is the Chinese Exclusion Act, this was the first time that United States passed a law that would not allow entry to a specific ethnic group in this case from China, Japan or any other Oriental countries. The act was targeting mainly Chinese workers, those who were unskilled and even those who were skilled but, they did make small exceptions with teachers, students, or officials. Middle class Chinese workers first became interested in the United States during…

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    Policies associated with immigration laws stem back in history, as early as 1790. Beginning with the Naturalization Act of 1790, as the first statute that imposed regulations on citizenship. The Act included criteria, such as two years of residency, good behavior and allegiance to the United States. Notwithstanding, those excluded from citizenship included blacks and children of fathers not born in the U.S. Inevitably, this representation of segregation took part in the restructuring of…

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    Should Citizenship Be a Birthright? The 14th amendment states all persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the states in which they reside. From the time someone is born in the hospital in the U.S., they are legally considered an U.S. citizen. The person is given a birth certificate and a social security number linking their identity to the government proving that he or she is a natural born citizen. In…

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    Immigration reform was a core issue in American politics even before the United States declared independence from Great Britain in the late 18th century. Determining which nations could immigrate to the United States and how many of these emigrants would be permitted to enter has always caused controversy in Washington. During various social and political crises, refugees from various nations have immigrated to America. Many of these immigrants have entered the US illegally, prompting the…

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    Immigrants in the United States The United States is a land of immigration and has experienced successive immigration waves. Since America is a country built of immigrants, they are truly the fabric of our society; and although we have had our fair share of mistakes regarding this phenomenon we are moving forward indefinitely. During the course of this paper, we will go over the Chinese Exclusion Act, The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire of 1911, Immigration Act of 1965 and The Patriot Act. The…

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    There is a general consensus among lawmakers and private citizens that America’s immigration system is broken. The agreement, however, ends there. An estimated 40.4 million foreign-born people reside in the United States, and of that number, 11.6 million are here illegally (Hipsman). Those here illegally cost American tax payers a staggering $113 billion each year, which is an unsustainable path. Clearly, the current immigration laws are not working. The laws are out of date with today’s…

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    Refutation for immigration policy: Part 3 of 3 There are some major concerns about increased immigration and its implementation, and that has led to various types of objection to the policy. Following the same logic used in favor of immigration, it is possible to discredit these arguments that many people, especially those who have a misunderstanding of the principle of pro-immigration policy frequently use. Commonly cited objections include the risk of increased crime from immigrants, wage…

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