Chinese Exclusion Act

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    The Effects Of The Chinese Exclusion Act

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    Specifically, the newly industrialized Japanese jumped at the chance. So instead of Chinese workers taking the jobs of iterant Californians, the Japanese were doing it instead. They came in such great numbers that the California legislature could not create an act quickly enough.[5] Because of this, quiet bitterness began to form in the place of public racism. While the Japanese and other eastern Asians were barred from entering the country in 1924, forty-two years of intense, bitter dislike for the Japanese did nothing but fan the flames of American Nativist policies. Denis Kearney stated that the Japanese and other East Asians, “Must Go.” [6] While the Chinese Exclusion Act was the first act of its kind in American legislature, it was not the last. In 1924, Calvin Coolidge signed the “National Origins, or Asian Exclusion Act” in response to increased Japanese immigrant and the desire to curb persecuted Jews from emigrating from America’s ‘current’ ally, Russia. At this time, however, Congressional opposition to the act was quite minimal. Popular opinion was strongly behind the act as well. [7] This time, however, the affected groups did not have to fully relinquish their traditions and culture. In five years, immigration from East Asia ceased almost entirely. With general anti-Japanese sentiments stemming from the Japanese defeat of the Russians in Russo-Japanese War, and anti-Japanese sentiments in America, the Japanese were treated almost exclusively as “aliens, unfit to…

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    Chinese Exclusion Act

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    President Chester A. Arthur introduced a new piece of legislation to the treaty known as the Chinese Exclusion Act, which prohibited almost all Chinese immigration to the United States. Signed into effect in 1882, and later made permanent in 1902, the Chinese Exclusion Act, which only affected a small percentage of immigrants, essentially established a distinction between legal and illegal immigrants while robbing western states of the cheap labor they depended on. In addition, between the…

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    Chinese Exclusion Act

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    Chinese Immigration & Exclusion Act The Chinese Exclusion Act was passed and then signed by President Chester A. Arthur in 1882. The Act was passed because the Chinese were working 2x as hard for half the pay. Another reason the law was passed was that the other races were jealous that the Chinese were thriving and they were hard-working. The Americans passed the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act because the Chinese were working 2x as hard for half the pay. According to Document A: Anti-Chinese…

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    Chinese Exclusion Act

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    of discrimination and demeaning labor, Chinese immigrants have never fully acclimated or been accepted completely into American culture and society. However, over the years Chinese Americans have overcome their initial hardships when first immigrating and have been successful in making a home for themselves here in the United States. Some such examples of this can be seen in New York Chinatowns and in San Francisco suburbs, and their Chinese culture and effects appear in many areas of the United…

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    The Chinese-Americans struggled the most to achieve equality and opportunity after the immigrating to America. The Chinese immigrated to America as workers. The paying wages in America were 10 times what was considered the norm for wages in China, so they immigrated to America. “After moving to the United states they were treated horribly they were even seen as “racially inferior” by the native born Americans.” (University library open collections program, Chinese exclusion act). The Chinese…

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    Reading Questions: 3. The Chinese Exclusion Act was the first major piece of immigration legislation in the United States and set a path for immigration in the 20th century. In 1882, the Chinese Exclusion Act was created and it only affected Chinese Laborers. This act made it illegal for Chinese laborers to enter the United States, but continued to allow merchants and teachers from China into the country. The textbook stated that the act was renewed in 1892, and made permanent in 1902, and…

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    The factors that contributed to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 were that working class of America were afraid that the Chinese would lower pay rates and end up taking their jobs as the time goes on. As the script of "The Chinese Must Go" say "Chinaman plenty work, plenty money, plenty to eat. Whiteman no work, no money, die- sabee?" This says that the Chinese have work and that supplies them with money and food, but the Whiteman has nothing and will die. Showing that the Chinese are trying…

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    The Chinese Exclusion Act

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    In the 1850s, many Chinese immigrants moved to America because of the gold and jobs opportunities. In 1882, President Chester Arthur signed the Chinese Exclusion Act (Lee 1882-1924). Which this document stated as the Chinese immigrants would be banned, and looking for work for 10 years (Lee 1882-1924). The Chinese Exclusion Acts were federal laws passed in 1882, 1892, and 1902 to prevent Chinese immigration to the United States(Glory 1900-1906) . Some of the rights of Chinese to immigrate to…

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    Chinese Americans After the Exclusion Acts in the United States Chinese immigrants coming to the United States faced many challenges due to not being naturalized citizens. The difficulties they faced included developing their own ethnic community, being denied equal rights to whites, and being placed into segregated communities. Since they were not considered citizens, they also did not have the right to vote, and own property. Asian immigrants went through many obstacles in order to obtain…

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    Chinese Exclusion Act The title of the document is the Chinese Exclusion Act of May 6, 1882. The document was written by the federal government of United States, passed by congress and signed by the President Chester A. Arthur. The document was written on 6th of May 1882. Chinese began to emigrate in the year of 1849, and the act was passed in 1882 so, this document was written approximately after 32 years the events described. In 32 years many things changed, the American government felt the…

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