Sudetenland

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    long list of revisions, there had been many territorial revisions. For example, the Polish Corridor, Austria, Czechoslovakia and the Sudetenland, and demilitarizing the Rhineland. Hitler made it his goal to gain back all of these territories. However, troubles began to brew when it came to taking back the Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia. Eventually, troubles regarding the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia became the focus point at the Munich Conference. During this conference, the fate of Czechoslovakia…

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    Germans, Czechs, Slovaks, and Poles would tear the country apart. Hitler already had his eyes set on reunifications of all German people and the oppression of ethnic Germans in the Sudetenland provided him with another testing ground for his policies. Bell states that the Heimatfront in the Sudetenland, led by Konrad Henlein, began calling for Sudeten autonomy and the acceptance of Nazi ideology in Czechoslovakia after the Austrian Anschluss. Hitler convened with Henlein in March of 1938 and…

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    expanding its borders and was gaining power and support of the German people. The League of Nations was created to stop another massive war from happening. Many believed that it was the League’s responsibility to deal with Hitler’s aggressive stance on taking over nations. The problem was that the League could not agree with an action to stop Hitler also they did not see the threat of Hitler because he was just taking over country’s that had a large population of Germans. With this threat…

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    The Munich Agreement

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    The European powers were devastated by the first World War and did not want another war to occur. Therefore, instead of intervention, they decided to appease. Appeasement can be defined in this situation as giving Hitler what he demanded, so that he would not start a war. The Sudetenland Crisis and the Munich Agreement are perfect examples of appeasement. They believed the loss of the Sudetenland would be very minimal in comparison to a war between the whole continent. The other European powers…

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    Script Hitler, we all know his story.... Or Do We! Hitler, who was born on April 20, 1889 Braunau am Inn, in Austria was a German dictator and politician. After Germany's lost in World War 1, the German people were hit with a bad depression. People lost jobs and many were forced to move out of their homes. Money was scarce. The people of Germany thought it was time for a new leader. So feeling desperate, they elected a new leader… Hitler and his Nazi party In his first days, Hitler was a…

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    Sudetenland It refers to the area of Czechoslovakia that were mainly inhabited by ethnic Germans. Spielvogel noted that “the Sudetenland also contained Czechoslovakia’s most important frontier defenses and considerable industrial resources as well” (836). Hitler knew the importance of this land. To gain this land, he required the cession of it to Germany, otherwise, he may start a war. He successfully persuaded Britain and French not to defend Czechoslovakia, which allowed Germany to occupy the…

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    On March 12, 1938, Hitler sent his illegal German army to Austria. The very next day, Austria voted to form a union with Germany, creating one large state. Jews and Roma (Gypsies) were not invited to vote for this decision. Hitler then threatened to start a war in Europe if his demands for the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia were not met. There was a conference held, without an invitation to Czechoslovakia, between Germany, Britain, and France. This was known as the Munich Conference. After the…

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    Hitler's Turning Points

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    again. He believed that he needed to expand Germany to grow his following. He wanted complete power to redeem WW1 and get revenge on the people that discriminated against Germany. It did not help that Germany had to abide by the Treaty of Versailles laws. The Treaty laws were mostly aimed at Germany and how they could pay for WW1. Hitler also believed that Jews contaminated the German population and blamed them for the loss of WW1. All these ideas were how Hitler believed would lead to the…

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    Sudetenland was the area predominantly German that was given to Czechoslovakia after the First World War. The people supported the German nationalist, anti-Czech movement, as they were reluctant to accept the treaty that placed them under Czechoslovakia in the beginning, and as dissatisfaction grew among the citizens during the Great Depression. The pro-German groups tried to urge the Czech government to Germany to prevent war. In April 1938, the Czech government issued full autonomy of…

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    Mussolini arranges a meeting between British Prime Minister Chamberlain, French President François de La Rocque and Hitler and they came to an agreement where Germany would take back the Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia and the Czechs are outraged that they aligned themselves with the people taking territory from their allies. The worst thing about it was all of the Czechoslovakia defences and military had been built in that area so when it was taken by Germany they had nothing left. There were…

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