Adolf Hitler And The Brownshirts

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12. The Sturmabteilung, also known as the Brownshirts, was the organization Adolf Hitler created to protect the Nazi Party from potential dangers at assemblies, but later began to disrupt rival parties’ meetings and to intimidate voters, Nazi opponents, and Jews in the streets. They were known as the Brownshirts because from the founding in 1921, the organization utilized brown shirts as their uniforms, as they were easily obtainable. The founding itself was controversial, as the Treaty of Versailles banned military organizations. By the time Hitler came into power in the early 1930s, this organization grew bigger than the army, as unemployment increased recruits. Possibly because of the rise in the Sturmabteilung’s power, Hitler, using the …show more content…
Sudetenland was the area predominantly German that was given to Czechoslovakia after the First World War. The people supported the German nationalist, anti-Czech movement, as they were reluctant to accept the treaty that placed them under Czechoslovakia in the beginning, and as dissatisfaction grew among the citizens during the Great Depression. The pro-German groups tried to urge the Czech government to Germany to prevent war. In April 1938, the Czech government issued full autonomy of Sudetenland and adopted a pro-German foreign policy. At the Munich Conference, Great Britain and France issued an ultimatum to Czechoslovakia to cede Sudetenland to Germany. Hitler also used Sudetenland as an excuse to attack and take over …show more content…
The Munich Agreement was a settlement between Germany, Great Britain, France, and Italy that allowed Germany to annex Sudetenland. Before the conference, British Prime Minister Chamberlain tried to persuade Czechoslovakia to accept Hitler’s continuously increasing demands of Sudetenland. When war was imminent, Chamberlain proposed a meeting of the four powers to try to keep the peace. On September 29, the four leaders of the countries, specifically, Hitler, Chamberlain, the Italian dictator Mussolini, and the French statesman Daladier met to discuss the terms. Mussolini supposedly proposed a plan, which was exactly the same as Hitler’s demands: Sudetenland was to be completely taken by Germany, by October 10. Czechoslovakia gave into that agreement. Chamberlain and Hitler signed an agreement to try to resolve conflicts peacefully. Although Chamberlain and Daladier returned home relieved that war was prevented, the peace would not last very

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