Sufism

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    Since they believed that the divine is everywhere and no sense of” you” as a separate individual remains. This oneness with God was clearly evident in almost all of Al- Hallaj’s poems, especially in his poem “I am He whom I love”, where he said that he and God are two souls blended in one “If thou seest me/thou seest Him/And if thou seest Him/thou seest us both (Badawi 47).In fact, the whole concept of unity lies in these line. Moreover, it’s important to note that in Sufism there’s amusement and celebration in the loss of identity in union with God. Whitman, on the other hand, shared this sense of oneness and unity with him. Throughout the whole poem Whitman made it clear that he feels united with god. For he knows that “The hand of god is the promise of my own/ The spirit of the god is the brother of my own (Whitman, section 5). Moreover, Whitman’s unity expanded to include other forms of unity. In his poem, we see him equating himself to other human beings. He sees himself as a reflection of other people and he sympathizes with people to the extent that their pain becomes his “In all people I see myself/…I am integral with you (Whitman, section 20, 21). Also Mansur al- Hallaj talked about the unity with other…

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    Epistle On Sufism

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    Guillermo Vasquez Ms. Bauman Essay 1 – Midterm 1 March 2016 Topic: Compare and contrast The Cloud of Unknowing and The Epistle on Sufism in relationship to how it relates to God, specifically between love, knowledge, and humility. The Cloud of Unknowing and The Epistle on Sufism, are both considered mysticisms because they both agree on the belief that direct knowledge of God, spiritual truth, or ultimate reality can be attained through subjective experience. In other words, a religious…

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    After reading Edward Said’s Orientalism, I understand why his piece has created such a visible legacy not only at Columbia but across academia. His ideas are revolutionary, striking at the foundations of academic institutions all over the world. As an individual, studying Islam and the Middle East of which my interests include Sufism, Sectarianism, and Fundamentalism, I am the product of orientalism, no doubt. As a member of this new generation of orientalists, however, what exactly is my…

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    The Babi-Bahai Faith

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    Words and concepts such as heart (inner essence), human spirit, and mirror are used extensively in both Sufi and Babi-Baha’i writings. In addition, explanation of concepts such as knowledge of God, divine presence, and reflection of divine attribute is also present in the writings of both Al-Ghazali and Bab. However, the interpretation of those concepts by Bab and Al-Ghazali distinguishes Sufism and Babi-Baha’i Faith. Al-Ghazali and Bab have different views towards the human nature and in…

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    The daily practices of heart prayer and fasting are conducted to achieve Godly anointment. This occurs during the 9th lunar period of the month and spiritual practices are connected in the spiritual way of Islam life. For instance, the Muhammad Mustafa, the Master of Mystics was a deep ascetic in heart and kept night vigil, went for solitary retreat and ate very little in the wilderness (Bruinessen 1). These frequent practices were conducted in the living world through the performance of every…

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    Akbar is able to cope with high stress situations and overcome any obstacle in a ideally peaceful mannerism. The preset conditions set by Jodhaa regarding the marriage were, that she is able to keep her hindu faith and continue to practice her faith and religion and that a small shrine be built in the temple so that she could worship krishna. I think the significance lies in the demonstration of tolerance and acceptance displayed by prince Akbar in accepting princess Jodhaa conditions which…

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    Spread Of Coffee

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    The spread of coffee from its humble beginnings in Yemen to its trade in the rest of Europe is curious. Trade, competition, and the desire for the energetic properties of coffee all fueled the spread of coffee, but what are the most important factors that influenced coffees’ spread to the rest of the world, and ultimately led it to become a global beverage? It was the open, traveling nature of Sufi sects that encouraged the spread of coffee outside of the Sufi dhikr worship meeting and into the…

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    Stereotypes Of Sufis

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    The general stereotype of the Sufis have been that of a sect of peace minus the rigidity of traditional Islam, but as the fifth chapter will note that this notion is a lot more complicated than thought. While it may be true that the Sufi have preached peace, it should be known that they also preached war as what will be noted in that chapter, by focusing on the writings of three most famous Sufi philosophers-al-Qushayri, al-Ghazali, and Rumi-it would be detailed in their thoughts on the concept…

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    When looking at contemporary literature from a philosophical point of view, one can often find truths that give us a greater understanding and awareness of our surroundings, literature allows us to expand our knowledge in a deeper, more connected way. Similar to this, Cassandra Clare, a poet from Tehran, Iran, once said that “Only the very weak-minded refuse to be influenced by literature and poetry.” In that light, Kaveh Akbar, a poet also from Tehran, shares a similar philosophy on literature…

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    Sufism In Islam Essay

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    Sufism is recognised as and can be referred to as Tasawwuf in islam. Sufism in the Muslim world first came around between the 8th and 9th centuries C.E. The people that follow Sufism are labelled Sufis and their aim is to pursue in finding the truth, they do this by having experiences with Allah. The main objective of the Sufi people is to be united with Allah in the next life e.g. heaven hence the reason why Sufism has established several spiritual performs that are focused on severe restraint…

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