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    HMS Victory: Royal Navy

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    HMS Victory is a 104-gun first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, ordered in 1758, laid down in 1759 and launched in 1765. She is best known as Lord Nelson's flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. She was also Keppel's flagship at Ushant, Howe's flagship at Cape Spartel and Jervis's flagship at Cape St Vincent. After 1824, she served as a harbor ship. In 1922, she was moved to a dry dock at Portsmouth, England, and preserved as a museum ship. She has been the flagship of the First Sea Lord since October 2012 and is the world's oldest naval ship still in commission. In December 1758, the commissioner of Chatham Dockyard was instructed to prepare a dry dock for the construction of a new first-rate ship. This was an unusual occurrence at the time, as the Royal Navy preferred smaller and more maneuverable ships, and it was unusual for more than two to be in commission simultaneously; during the whole of the 18th century, only ten were constructed. Then Prime Minister Pitt the Elder placed the order for Victory on 13 December 1758, along with 11 other ships. The outline plans were based on HMS Royal George which had been launched at Woolwich Dockyard in 1756, and the naval architect chosen to design the ship was Sir Thomas Slade who, at the time, was the appointed…

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    Napoleon Nationalism

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    like these were oftentimes hung in museums and displayed publicly to improve Britain’s cultural identity and sense of nationalism (Hoock 568-569, 590-591). It can be argued that people saw paintings displaying decisive naval victories and then proceeded to further support the British government. According to N.A.M. Rodger, naval expenditures rose throughout the Napoleonic Wars (Roger 644-645). As such, it was vitally important for the British government to keep the citizens content with the…

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    advantage of America as if they were still under control, and captured any American sailors they could find. This atrocity to America was called impressment. Britain would force the captured sailors to serve in their Navy to fight in the Napoleonic Wars. Anyone who refused would be taken prisoner. A similar incident happened to the…

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    History shows that when faced with unpalatable choices and the reality of the environment-capability gap, leaders often cycle back to prior phases in the design process . The British Royal Navy confirmed this regression when they dismissed the findings of the 1924-1925 Newport simulations, which revealed superior advantage to carriers that could mass aircraft in repetitive pulses. Although, the Royal Navy lacked this capability, they discounted emerging doctrine from the US Marine Fleet…

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    Napoleonic War Dbq

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    One habit of the Royal Navy during the beginning of the 19th century, known as impressment, was to force crewmembers on American vessels to enlist in the Royal Navy by claiming them as English deserters, as there was at the time no way to distinguish Americans from British (Heidler). These acts constituted a military effort against the United States, which was at the time immoral because the United States was neutral, not a French ally. The British took their military pressure one step further,…

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    Woman’s group From 1960 to the early 1970s the influx of married women workers accounted for almost half of the increase in the total labor force, and working wives were staying on their jobs longer before starting families. The woman’s group is a group of women that work instead of men when men go to the war. Almost 400,000 women served the armed forces—a number that exceeded total male troop strength in 1939. During WWII, the role of women in the service and on the home front has expanded…

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    supported by Royal authority. The history of protective legislation for South Carolina is woven into the origins of the colony. South Carolina began as a colonial charter given to eight Lords Proprietors by King Charles II in 1663. While an in-depth look at the history of the Lords Proprietors can be found in Peter Coclanis’ book The Shadow of a Dream, the situation by 1715 had altered significantly from the charter’s original intention. Frequent attacks by the French and Spanish plagued the…

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    One major cause for the French and Indian War was the creation of the Albany Congress. The Iroquois Confederacy was a strong coalition of several Indian tribes. This made them a valuable asset towards the British as having them as an ally could result in an easier victory over the inevitable war against the French. This coupled along with issues over governance produced the assembly. Overall this assembly was a complete bust as Britain was scared the committee would overpower the royal…

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    Trafalgar Battle Analysis

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    battle was fought to determine European naval supremacy and would promptly halt Napoleon’s forces, preventing the impending French invasion of England (Adkins, 337). Trafalgar was won through the sheer force of overwhelming manpower, superior technology and firepower ability, and excellence of British organizational strategy. Not only were the British superior in every aspect of warfare but the disobedience and disorganization of French officers, as well as the maltreatment of the Spanish…

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    Captain Kidd started his life on the sea from a young age. He served on a French pirate ship which later he and some English men took over. Kidd became captain and was hired by the british to fight in the ongoing war for the caribbean between them and the French. He was mutinied and lost his original ship but was given another one by his English employer. After a while Kidd left and sailed for New York. In New York he was able to remove an illegitimate government from power and gain some respect…

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