Redlining

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    Redlining In Society

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    practice of redlining. Lending companies and banks withhold mortgages and other loans from people who live in neighborhoods of certain ethnic makeups. In a perfect world, arbitrary factors such as race would not affect someone’s ability to buy a home. Unfortunately, we do not live in a perfect world. Even in our supposedly “progressive” nation, prejudice against people of color runs rampant. Though there has been a definite decrease in blatant redlining, subtle redlining remains a prevalent issue in society today. Redlining has not improved much over time- it has only transformed. Many blame the Home Owner’s Loan Corporation (HOLC) for the creation of redlining. Established in 1933 as part of the New Deal, this organization created the infamous color-coded Residential Security Maps. The color red was assigned to the highest-risk areas. From 1936 to 1940, HOLC…

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    Preface: Historical preservation has been mostly understood by the means of preserving the physical artifact. However, in an urban context, what makes artifacts’ character “distinctive” and “definitive” is not only their physicality but also their memory. To this end, Also Rossi’s argues for “the soul of the city” as the city’s history, its memory. Although we all travel backward in time through memory, history and memory should be distinguished totally from each other, the former belongs to a…

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    Gentrification Essay

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    What is Gentrification? Gentrification can have a negative connotation and is often compared to white flight, it also can be seen as a race issue. Whereas, a Caucasian population will take over poverty stricken mixed-race neighborhoods and revitalize them with their newly brought in businesses. Alex Schafran writes in the Berkeley Planning Journal, “residents of gentrifying neighborhoods have been "displaced" from the literature on the subject. [They] are so busy trying to define it, quantify…

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    The United States government has implemented many policies that ban redlining in the United States; However, many big business corporations and banks still practice redlining indirectly to this day. In 2008, congress passed the Safe Act in order to protect citizens from discrimination and fraud of redlining in their neighborhoods (Carson). This act was essential for American citizens, especially minorities because they were discriminated against when trying to own a home or take a loan out of…

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    Banks used this concept to deny loans to any African American community that needed them. This discrimination led to economic crisis, because every company was trying to either deny service or raise the price so that African Americans wouldn’t afford it. It was called redlining, because these companies and especially banks put a red line of separation between races and the way services are offered to each race. The practice of redlining was spread almost everywhere until 1964 when the Civils…

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    Intellectual Segregation

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    shortages because of World War I and the immigration halt of 1921, it resulted in the Great Migration’s mass movement. While the Great Migration did offer better lives for some people, it also caused problems like crowding and increased racial tensions in urban areas. Attempts to move into white neighborhoods were met with threats, forcing many people to settle in tiny, underserviced, and segregated areas within the city. When coupled with redlining, this made life incredibly financially…

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    are real. Racial minorities typically find themselves struggling to wade through racism weaved into our political and social institutions. Institutionalized discrimination can take place in the accumulation of wealth, the legal system, and education. These institutionalized forms of racism result in social and economic inequities that people of color consistently have to face. With the institutionalization of racism, we find a new form of segregation. One not established by law or policies, but…

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    Fair Lending Case Summary

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    Prior to the 1970s, discriminatory lending practices became hidden produces in central cities across the nation. The origins of fair lending litigation can be traced back to a 1976 redlining case in Oakley, Cincinnati. It was not until 1968, when the Fair Housing Act and other federal provisions regarding discrimination became law binding. A precedent regarding the application and interpretation of the anti-discrimination provisions was waiting to be set for local neighborhoods in the United…

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    First, racist policies such as redlining made it easy for white, middle to upper class families to move to the suburbs and separate from African American and Latino populations. According to the article “How Redlining Led to Rioting”, “white society” is the idea that the government makes racist laws that ensures African Americans and white Americans would have separate communities and spheres of life. Redlining is the process of denying services to a specific demographic either directly or…

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    has the predominant choice over where they can live and who they want in their neighborhood is shown every day in the covert practices that prevent minorities from moving into the suburbs, therefore keeping it homogenous-mostly White- and affluent (Seitles). It is difficult to ascertain what living situation Blacks would want, because it is impossible to say that forced segregation does not influence their decision making, therefore, there is no real choice available (Myrdal 620-621).…

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