George Berkeley

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    George Berkeley

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    George Berkeley is famously known for his statement, “Esse est percipi” which means if we are able to perceive something then it certainly exists. Nothing outside our minds exists, meaning material substances are irreconcilable. Perceiving is the entity equated to mind, body and soul or simply our self. Ideas exist and are imprinted through the sense faculty. Ideas are actively perceived by this entity called the ‘Spirit’. The existence of things which we do not perceive is left within the mind of the highest being who is God. Even though Berkeley strongly critiqued John Locke’s empiricism in the radical way, he himself can be considered as an idealist. For Berkeley, primary and secondary qualities are unnecessary because they are mainly subsisted through matter. Although it is very much contradictory because for Berkeley, matter or any corporeal thing does not exist…

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    George Berkeley Analysis

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    George Berkeley, A treatise concerning the principles of human knowledge In this essay I will be discussing a few sections from George Berkeley, A treatise concerning the Principle of human knowledge. I will explain the arguments being set out by Berkeley within the text, then I will proceed to make an objection of my own, which I will respond to on behalf of Berkeley. George Berkeley starts off introducing us to his theory “to be is to be perceived”. Within the first few paragraphs of the…

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    discussions of language found in Hobbes (Leviathan, Chapter IV: Of Speech), Locke (An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Bk.III: Chapter I: Of Words of Language in General) and Berkeley (A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, Introduction §19 ff). To do this, I will be providing an account of each of the scholar’s views and from this distinguishing the similarities and differences of these views. The philosophy of language aims to solve issues surrounding language use and to…

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    Visualization and Mind-Dependent Objects If I tell you that everything in the world that you can see only exists in your mind, would you believe me? Most likely, you would think that the idea is absurd and that it is against common sense. What if I say that there are philosophers that can prove this concept? In the First Dialogue of Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous, George Berkeley does just that. He simulates dialogues between two philosophers to try to show that mind-independent…

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    Bessel's Theory

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    3.) How did the work of Bessel relate to the work of Locke, Berkeley, and other empirical philosophers? There were two conclusions that originated from Bessel's finding. The first was that cosmologists would need to consider the way of the human eyewitness since individual qualities and recognitions would impact the detailed perceptions. The second was if the part of the human eyewitness must be considered in stargazing, then it was additionally essential in each other science that depended on…

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    John Locke Simple Ideas

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    Kant believes the mind is an empty until engaged with the actions of the world. Kant established this kind of knowledge by rejecting the empiricist assertion that experience is the source of all our ideas. Kant argues that experience is possible through the minds structuring. Kant gives a god argument and it establishes what Berkeley and Hume failed to see. Kant explains that the mind brings to objects rather than given to the mind by objects, and this explains why they are indispensable to…

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    Berkeley thought that the distinction between qualities invites all sorts of skepticism. If we know only our own ideas, how can we trust them without ever comparing them to unmediated reality? The solution is simple: deny the existence of matter. If an apple is not only our collection of perceptions but also a material object, we may doubt that object, and such doubt is abhorrent to common sense. However, if we define the apple as nothing more than our perceptions, it is beyond doubt. The world…

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    Kant’s Categorical Imperative According to Kant, we should always act according to the individual 's duty, not anticipating any consequences ahead. If each individual act accordingly, I believe that there will be less negative events occur and more positive outcomes. For example, sometimes doing negative things is wrong, such as lying. If we were to lie for a positive outcome, then it proves that if each individual act accordingly, then there will less negative outcome and it also proves that…

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    After reading about John Locke’s empiricism, I think that he is right about the tabula rasa. Locke believed that human beings were born with a blank state mind, just like a blank white piece of paper that has no words or ideas to it. He stated that everybody enters the world with no previous knowledge nor understanding about anything, and the only way to gain knowledge and furnish our brain is through experience. Locke claims that in order to come up with conclusions and grasp an understanding…

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    This is evident in the sheer fact that Berkeley devoted his introduction of Principles to the refutation of the doctrine of abstraction. However this raises the question: Why did Berkeley feel so strongly? Why does Berkeley feel the need to reject abstraction? The answer to these questions is two-fold. First and foremost, Berkeley sees Locke’s doctrine of abstraction as a detractor from the overall purpose of his philosophical work. “Philosophy being nothing else but the study of wisdom and…

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