Boarding school

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    colonialism on their own lands and boarding schools represented a pick in brainwashing and indoctrination into an unknown world. Bonding and parenting are two strong collectivist values among Indian people, and those two notions became inexistent and incompatible with boarding schools. As Rebecca Peterson vigorously testifies in her essay, The Impact of Historical Boarding Schools on Native American Families and Parenting Roles, schools were often built far enough from reservations to discourage parental visits. In addition to the geographical distance, special attention was paid when children reached puberty. As Rebecca Peterson writes, “coming of age was important to the…

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    Research has found many repercussions of the Native American boarding school experience. Some former students state that being at boarding school was a form of childhood trauma that they may never be able to get over (Yuan et al., 2014). Evans-Campbell, Walters, Pearson, and Campbell (2012) found that former boarding school students had higher rates of drug and alcohol use and were more likely to have attempted suicide. Additionally, this study also found that students were more likely to have…

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    1. What were the goals of the Indian boarding schools? Indian boarding schools were the brain child of Captain Richard Henry Pratt. After his experiment on immersing Plains Indian prisoners of war in the white culture, he believed the best way to “solve” the “Indian problem” was to brainwash the children. By isolating and “deprograming” the Native American children, the American government could break up the tribal mentality of the next generation. They were punished for any use of their…

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    placed in boarding schools. Both of these documents revolve around these boarding schools. Both documents; though, show the boarding schools as good things, even though they were not. Indian boarding schools were built to transform Native Americans, destroying their identities, eradicating Native religions, customs, and traditions and demolishing Native languages. The first document is a picture of young girls at a boarding school. The picture is of young girls at St. Benedict's Mission,…

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    THE CULTURAL SHOCK OF NATIVE AMERICAN BOARDING SCHOOLS Native American Boarding Schools in the United States was an American effort to assimilate the Indian children, ages three through the teen years, into becoming Americans. In these schools, they would strip the children of their Native culture and introduce American culture. The American government would take the children from their parents to schools that were not located on reservation property, but rather on United States property. The…

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    Boarding School Concepts

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    Concept of Boarding Schools Boarding schools are an intensive form of education, in which students live at school, and visit their families only for specific days and vacations. There is a long-standing tradition among upper-class families of sending male children to elite boarding schools even at a very young age. Akyi et al. (2008) argue that by doing so, parents hope to provide their children a sense of discipline, and, thus, prepare them for leadership positions. But boarding schools have…

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    their children to be in a boarding school. I have never thought of a boarding school because, I never really knew they existed. I knew about private, public, and homeschool that was pretty much it. My family has not considered a boarding school because they are farther away and more money than an average private school. In a boarding school I would look for a good education, orchestra, animals, fun sports, and just things to keep myself busy. These things are a lot to ask for even a private…

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    Slavery? Or live like a queen? These are my choices of whether I want to slave away in a boarding school, in Iceland, or if I want to keep going to private school, where I never have to do anything. Besides sit, listen, and take the one and only rest we ever have to take, at the end of each school year. This test is about fifteen questions and it's really quite simple. The private school I go to, is called Queen Elizabeth High School, hence why I am getting asked if I want to live like a queen.…

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    and the poem “Indian Boarding School: The Runaways” by Louise Erdrich, each of the writers focus on the positive and negative aspects of education. While part of the setting for Louise Erdrich’s poem and Elizabeth Wong’s story take place inside an actual school, the setting for Toni Cade Bambara’s story doesn’t take place inside a school; however, for all three stories, the characters in them are taught very important lessons. When I think about the three readings it reminds me that we have…

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    am very surprised by this video and what I learned in it. I could not imagine being taken from my home to go to a boarding school to learn a certain way of life. America was founded on the idea of freedom and this is not at all a reflection of that. Those children grew up learning a completely different way of life compared to what they should have learned. At those boarding schools one of the ladies said they had belts without buckles on it for whipping them. She also tells us that she…

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