American journalists

Sort By:
Decent Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Amazing Essays
Best Essays
    Page 1 of 50 - About 500 Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Politician and American Journalist, Clare Luce, delivered a speech at the Women's National Club. The guest of honor, Luce publicly expresses her gratitude and excitement towards the American Press. Luce emphasizes the tone of excitement to criticize how journalists provide on article with what the public desires. Luce prepares to continue the speech with, "I stand here at this rostrum invited to throw rocks at you." Luce adopts an excited and criticizing tone towards the audience of journalists, while using extended metaphor of throwing rocks. In which is being compared to harsh words that'll hit them with much impact such as rocks. Although Luce is aware of how journalists write their stories in favor of the public eye, she criticizes how…

    • 392 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Good Essays

    Three Things I Learned In a world full of sensationalized news stories, propaganda, and a need and greed for ratings, isn’t better to skip watching the news? In the document, “What is a Journalist”, it seems that a journalist should have a heart and integrity. Then upon reading, “How Journalists Write”, it is very obvious, that journalists are forced to sensationalize. Look at Fox news and the Ebola scare. I was ready to run to the woods and pull all my money out of the stock market. If…

    • 307 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    attacks, journalists were swept up in the national feelings of fear and outrage -- and failed to do their job”, this quote is the very first statement made by Bonner in his article. He had written about the journalists’ exaggeration of the event into fears could have been avoided. Also,…

    • 959 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Amazing Essays

    ambitious rethinking of how journalists are trained. Concerned about the misinformation among Americans who rely on media as their main source of information, Patterson traces the quickening of news cycles from trends to process to elucidate how they have resulted in the loss of accuracy in reporting. Today’s journalists too often give equal weight to facts and biased opinions - stirring up small controversies and misjudging the context of facts. Many times they decide to substitute infotainment…

    • 1332 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Amazing Essays
  • Amazing Essays

    Media Bias In News Report

    • 1819 Words
    • 8 Pages

    This basic detail can make a big difference on how the report is presented. Leaving out important details can distort the story of how it really was. However, if the journalist has enough sources of where to get information to support their arguments, and cover all the basic questions, the report is going to be well supported. Not only variety of sources in the story can have an impact on the report but also loaded words have an important role on how people perceived the news. Loaded words are…

    • 1819 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Amazing Essays
  • Amazing Essays

    weakness of how we interpreted life in the aftermath. Bonner and Faludi both argue people are too quick to believe anything and everything the media shares publicly. “After the attacks, journalists were swept up in the national feelings of fear and outrage -- and failed to do their job”, this quote is the very first statement made by Bonner in his article (2011 para. 1). He wrote about the journalists’ exaggeration of the event and how it turned…

    • 1064 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Amazing Essays
  • Better Essays

    regards to reporting events responsibly, and (2) can Biblical ethics be applied to modern journalism? Western society has always had an almost a morbid infatuation with crime and punishment, i.e., the dirty laundry of others. This student/advocate has noticed on numerous occasions anchors that have a gleam in their eye when relating the dirty laundry of others. The media has a responsibility to report events in a truthful manner; however, it can be argued that many journalists today trade…

    • 1067 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Dale Maharidge Analysis

    • 972 Words
    • 4 Pages

    serious issues, sought to inform citizens enough so that we may make our own decisions; apart from the shining few journalists that practice this principle, it has been all but abandoned. Dale Maharidge is one of those few. In his 2009 interview with the Huffington Post, Maharidge discusses the matters of the…

    • 972 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Journalists are more than often praised, honored, or congratulated for their work; however, they also find themselves, at times, being criticized for some of their images. Journalists publish many different genres of stories throughout their career, so which ones are the ones that spark criticism, and is this criticism valid? Quite obviously it’s the stories that include violent images or some sort of malicious act of crime. In order to develop their stories, journalists make their way to the…

    • 1331 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Neutral Media Bias

    • 1383 Words
    • 6 Pages

    our society. The public puts the most trust within the media and it fails them by not taking the time to provide only facts. Media bias encompasses a variety of faults that not only include inaccurate and biased information, but also the lack of representing minority viewpoints and groups and minimalizing some hardworking journalists and news stories. This issue can be helped from the viewers by not giving in as passive watchers of the news and become a media activists.…

    • 1383 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Previous
    Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 50