Alexander Pushkin

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    Alexander Pushkin’s The Captain’s Daughter is a coming of age narrative. Throughout the work, Pushkin illustrates many familial relationships surrounding the protagonist, Petr Andreevich Grinev. These relationships Pushkin creates in The Captain’s Daughter are beyond Petr’s mother and father, stretching into non-biological relationships that mimic the growth-fostering environments and experiences of the nuclear family. When considering Petr’s migration to Fort Belogorsk, these non-biological relationships play a critical role in his maturation process from child to adult. By critically analyzing Petr’s relationships to other in the story, it can be seen that Pushkin uses these familial relationships as a facilitation mechanism for Petr’s development…

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    Trickster Story Analysis

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    allegorical world. Linda M. Morra and Deanna Reder’s Troubling Tricksters: Revisioning Critical Conversations, propose that the purpose of every trickster tale is to “[articulate] ambiguous distinctions between human and divine realities, with the final goal being in the development of ‘civilized’ codes of morality, values, and ideology” (30). Any culture is influenced by the trickster and the narrator in Eugene Onegin, written by Alexander Pushkin…

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    Russian Recluse

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    Russian Recluse Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel, Notes From Underground, takes place in St. Petersburg, Russia in the 1860s. He portrays his nameless main character, the Underground Man, as a recluse who dislikes people and avoids human society. The novel is written as a memoir from notes that the man writes, recounting his life, as he isolates himself off from society. His misery and inability to interact with others only pushes him further away from society into a world of self-loathing and…

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    relationships Pushkin is trying to emphasize. Pushkin strategically uses Tatyana and Olga as sisters who possess polar…

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    meaning and the way names are spelled changes over time and across the world. Our names, meanings, nicknames, and why we were named what we were, are just a few ways that shape are uniqueness. Originating from the Greek name Alexandros, Alexander signified "shielding men" from the Greek word alexo, which means "to guard. Help" and the Greek word aner, which means "man". The name Alexander additionally has a place with a legend of Paris in Greek mythology and has a place with a few characters in…

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    Finding Nemo is a movie that begins with a family of fish. The mother and almost all of her eggs are attacked. The mother is killed along with all of the eggs, except one. The final egg left is named Nemo, and is raised solely by his father, Marlin. In the attack, Nemo was injured and now has one fin that is smaller than the other. He does not let his fin define him and calls it his “lucky” fin. After seeing his family killed, Marlin is very over protective of Nemo and is very nervous to let him…

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    Transcending almost 3000 years of time with its emotional resonance, integrity, and relevance to both the Ancient and Modern world, the Iliad is arguably one of the most outstanding poetic feats in the history of Western literature, praised explicitly throughout the ages by esteemed historians and scholars alike. Between its undeniable influence on Alexander the Great and it’s correlation to Rome, the Iliad certainly has a lot to say about the ancient world that so quickly embraced it’s epic…

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    The main differences between Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson lie behind what they thought the principle of government was. According to Hamilton, government was needed to protect individual liberties. Hamilton was the leader of the Federalist Party also known as the Hamiltonians, who strongly supported his ideas. They believed in order for Americans to be free they needed a strong central government ran by well-educated people such as Hamilton himself, to protect individual liberty. “He…

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    It was agreed upon in the Constitution that “Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed” (Jefferson). By stating this it was absolute that those who were in a position of power are there because the people they over-see. Some of the men behind the support for the Constitution were Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay. Although the Federalist strongly supported this change there were many disagreements from the Anti-Federalist…

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    Written roughly two millenniums ago in Ancient Greece, The Odyssey has become a highly praised piece of writing and has been read by many people worldwide. Two thousand years later, the film Batman Begins was released. Both of these works have achieved groundbreaking success in having a place in the hearts of its audiences. To begin, both The Odyssey and Batman Begins had plots written under the Hero’s journey format. As in many hero stories, the plot begins with the main characters, Odysseus…

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