Union Army

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    The Union Army entered the war with a strong advantage in artillery. It had ample manufacturing capacity in Northern factories, and it had a well-trained and professional officer corps manning that branch of the service. Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, who was the chief of artillery for the Army of the Potomac for part of the war, was well recognized as a most efficient organizer of artillery forces, and he had few peers in the practice of the sciences of gunnery and logistics. Another example was John Gibbon, the author of the influential Artillerist's Manual published in 1863 (although Gibbon would achieve considerably more fame as an infantry general during the war). Shortly after the outbreak of war, Brig. Gen. James Wolfe Ripley, Chief of Ordnance, ordered the conversion of old smoothbores into rifled cannon and the manufacture of…

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    The Battle of Gettysburg, fought in July 1863, was a Union victory that stopped Confederate General Robert E. Lee's second invasion of the North. More than 50,000 men fell as casualties during the 3-day battle, making it the bloodiest battle of the American Civil War. The Battle of Gettysburg The Battle of Gettysburg was the largest and bloodiest battle ever fought in North America. During the first three days of July 1863, the Union Army of the Potomac and the Confederate Army of Northern…

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    Battle Of Wilderness Essay

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    South, also known as the Union and the Confederacy respectively, and it was a war fought by both sides for their beliefs and ideals, with the Confederates fighting to preserve their way of life and the Union fighting to bring the Confederacy back into the Union. The Battle of Wilderness is a major battle that occurred in Spotsylvania and Orange Counties, Virginia. The Union army(Potomac Army) was Ulysses S. Grant and the Confederate army was lead by Robert E. Lee. Out of the blue the battles…

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    The article “Gettysburg In The Civil War” was about the Battle of Gettysburg. Lee’s first journey failed, then in June 1863 he tried again by marching north to Pennsylvania. Lee’s campaign was going well. Hooker had proposed to attack Richmond but was rejected in Washington. Hooker was then replaced by General George Meade. Stuart decided to ride around the Union Army to gather troop information. Stuarts costly decision took longer than expected, so Lee had to go without knowing where the Union…

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    terrain was disadvantageous to both sides, the Union didn’t take advantage of the surplus of troops, General Lee’s battle plans were spread, and many other battlefield errors, this was the bloodiest single day in American history. The topics that are going to be covered are: A overview of the battle in general; The situation of both the Union and the Confederacy during the battle; The mission of both the Union and the Confederacy; how the battle was executed for both the Union and the…

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    Pickett's Charge Essay

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    1-3, 1863 was fought at a town called, Gettysburg, which was the intersection of the principle streets, in Pennsylvania, while Gen. Lee was gone to Maryland and Pennsylvania through Virginia 's Shenandoah Valley. The fight was a serial of forth and back of their past positions between the armed forces. Armed force of Potomac (90,000 men under Gen. George G. Meade) and the Confederate armed force (75,000 man of Northern Virginia Army under Gen. Robert E. Lee) met up in a three days of encounters.…

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    Sherman's Total War

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    employed total warfare, an essential tactic to defeating the Confederate Army. Union General William T. Sherman’s plan was a key factor in winning the civil war. His plan was to lead a destructive march to the sea and through the Carolinas, a risky idea. On this brutal march Sherman guarantees success with total war; a tactic he pioneered. The resistance that was left to face Sherman’s army was a picnic for him to defeat. The Union’s victory would not have been possible without what Sherman…

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    Unfortunately, it is impossible to know for sure, but from my analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of both, the Union's victory was inevitable. Jackson was not the only factor in the union winning the war. There were a number of factors that contributed to the victory of the union. The south did not have a strong industrial base. This ultimately resulted in in their subpar weaponry unlike the Union. The lack of the correct equipment for war greatly decreased any chance of the south's…

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    During the Atlanta Campaign, Sherman went right after the Confederates major supply line, bringing the Union fame, but the Confederates shame. Atlanta was one of the most important cities to the Confederates. Atlanta was the Confederates major supply line, and losing Atlanta would be catastrophic. On July 17, while the Confederate army is mostly in trenches surrounding Atlanta, President Jefferson Davis decides that Atlanta is too important to lose, and Johnston isn’t doing well-enough.…

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    He was promoted from leader of an Ohio volunteer army to major general in the Union army at one point he was even nicknamed “The Young Napoleon.” However, his success was cut short by a series of failed battles and poor strategic decisions. President Lincoln began to see McClellan’s leadership as a hindrance to the Union Army, his perceived failure to induce a full-fledged success at Antietam was the last straw and caused Lincoln to dismiss him from his rank as general-in-chief. McClellan’s…

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