Great Fire of London

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    This would of forced the City to pay back the damages to all of its citizens. So instead, an inferno caused by a forgetful baker, fueled by a strong wind and indecisive leadership, was blamed on Catholics and a young Frenchmen for over 150 years. Overlooked however, is the role of Sir Bloodworth; though Sir Bloodworth might not have had a personal hand in starting the fire, abusing his civic duty allowed the destruction of the Fire to increase before authoritative action was taken by Charles II. Hubert was executed and Farriner condemned in history as the careless baker who burned down the City of London; however, another person that played a major role in the destruction of the City was The Lord Mayor, Sir Thomas Bloodworth. After about…

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    St Pauls Cathedral Fire

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    Tuesday saw the greatest destruction. The fire storm fanned by easterly gale force winds, jumped fire breaks and continued onward to the west. It destroyed the Dukes command post at Temple Bar and destroyed the luxury shopping street of Cheapside. The greatest loss on this day was St. Pauls Cathedral. Most people thought the churches thick stone walls and the natural fire break of an empty surrounding plaza would protect it from the fire. However the church was undergoing restoration by…

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    in the midst of some of the most momentous events in English history. Pepys bore witness to and recorded the second Anglo-Dutch war, the Great Fire of London, and what the Restoration or even the Great Plague was like experience. And while these events can be found in history books, Samuel Pepys’ diary brings something to the table that a group of…

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    the decline around September of 1666 when the Great Fire erupted. The Great Fire killed bacteria that ended major plagues in London because the fire destroyed plague ridden houses and burning is scientifically proven to kill…

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    As it uses the diary as its source, it is reliable. This article first describes the events right before Pepys wrote his diary, when Cromwell died, and the government was unsteady. It then gives an overview of each month Pepys wrote his diary during. Some of the events include the great fire of london, and Pepys’ bladder stone operation. Finally, the article concludes with some events after Pepys stopped writing the diary, such as his travels with his wife Elizabeth and her death, as well as his…

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    The Enlightenment Era

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    focused on more than just religion based ideas. The Enlightenment produced countless essays, inventions, scientific discoveries, laws, and revolutions. Writers also sought to examine society and human nature and enlighten their readers in a way that captured the era’s ideals. Daniel Defoe and Jean de la Fontaine are two of many writers to successfully capture multiple major ideals. Daniel Defoe, one of the countless writers in the Enlightenment Era, was open minded in writing his works. Defoe…

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    In Herlihy first essay the “ Bubonic Plague…”he questions if the Black Death was even a plague. He goes back and does his research and notes the medieval chroniclers failed to mention the mass deaths of rats and other rodents, a necessary forerunner to the plague - epizootics, also didn't mention certain characteristic that aren't typically seen in a plague. His theory about the plague was that the “plague was just combinations of several diseases; “sometimes [they] worked together to produce…

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    writings of Barowski show how remaining indifferent to views from people in power can have extreme drawbacks on the psychology and morality of people during time of trauma. In addition Barowski mentions his believe that “world is ruled by power and power is obtained with money”. As a result, history gives us insights into the dangers of certain political structures and allows us to identify and react to similar acts of discrimination in the future. In addition, the publications of survivors of…

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    for progress towards public health is also evident in 17th century London during one of the last plague outbreaks in Europe. In response to the recurring outbreaks the bills of mortality were created by state authorities. The bills were published once a week representing the death tally and information of city deaths. Moreover, memory does not always have to occur for human rights progress but can create a genre of historical fiction that may record the collective memory of a society under the…

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    due to fear of the potential of a traumatic experience, the infected people were confined to their home. While Defoe believed the act was unsuccessful at stopping the spread, he believed the “confined the distempered people, who would otherwise have been both very troublesome and very dangerous” were constrained.While the act was introduced with good intentions, it is described by Defoe as a “great subject of discontent” (Journal Of A Plague Year, 369) . In addition, not only did the confinement…

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