Compact Disc player

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    Sound Design In Theatre

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    These ones and zeroes were then converted back into sound by a laser which scans the surface of the disc whilst it spins. This was an incredible leap forward for sound on a global scale. Sound was now easily accessible ad more affordable then it had been before. For sound designers, the invention of the rewritable CD was incredibly important. This meant that sound designers could create their own sounds, effects and cue; pick levels and adjust the sound before producing a final copy. It also meant that if a sound wasn’t right they could burn a new sound over the same CD (Glenn, 2014; Tracey; 1986; Schwartz, 2016). This was a massive leap forward from the records and tape recorders that were previously available for use in the theatre. To play back a CD during a performance there were few options available to sound operators. When CD players were introduced into theatrical sound systems, it was a unique situation for operators to adapt to. In their book, Sound and Music for the Theatre, Deana Kaye and James Lebrecht muse about the cross over from track tape decks to CD players. “Early in my career designing sound, I created extremely ambitious sound cue sequences that had to be operated manually… One cue sequence required controlling an eight track tape deck, five auto-cueing DAT players, and two CD players while mixing…

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    Sony’s first portable CD player, the Discman D-50, was introduced in November 1984. At first, the D-50 was not profitable but as the product gained popularity, it soon became profitable, and Sony began to create a portable CD market. The Discman range was later re-named to CD Walkman. In 2001 something came onto the market that changed the way we listen to music. The iPod. It was the first listening device where you could upload songs digitally, storing 100's in one go.Though the iPod…

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    contemporary means of music distribution, and identify which is currently the most profitable and widely used, and why they are used and the effect they have on the music industry. This information will then be used to predict which method of distribution will survive the test of time, and potentially be the means of distribution that could still be in use 15 years from now. This essay will explore the profitability and popularity of three different platforms: vinyl records, digital downloads,…

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    The music industry is a multi billion dollar industry that affects all of us. Music is different for everyone, some people are addicted to it while others could care less if there's music playing or not. But over the past decade the music industry has seen seen some of the lowest revenue since the 1950’s. So in this essay I will explain why this is happening, and how the music industry is changing. Music has been around for hundreds of years and music has always been popular and throughout…

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    Music, through its various forms, will never cease to vanish. From cassettes, to records, to mix tapes, to records, to cds, and to today’s digital downloads, music has evolved in the way that we obtain it. No matter how many decades and centuries have past, people still continue to collect even the oldest forms of music and visit places like record shops. Through the age of digital media, record stores continue to live and people still collect vinyls instead of downloading music online.…

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    Free Persuasive Speech

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    Introduction to vinyl What do you hear when you hear to word vinyl? Do you think of those old records that would play music on a spinning platform with a needle; well you're wrong. Vinyl is just a fancy word for sticker, but it’s not a sticker. Unlike stickers vinyl will stick to a surface for a very long time if you take care of it. Also a sticker is made out of paper with a sticky adhesive and can be remove. Removing a stick involves a lot more work that vinyl. You have to peel it off but now…

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    Cd Sales Decline

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    Over the year, the continuing decline of CD sales along with the rapid growth of music downloads signals a new era in music. In the same way they started selling CDs in 1982 to replace vinyl records because they were too big, and CDs were more portable. Now people start to download music online, and they stop buying and using CDs. Although, some people think that buy CDs help to artist or the music listening experience is more enjoyable, but equally they buy music for internet and do use CDs for…

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    The Vinyl Countdown Over the past seventy years the way music is stored, played and displayed has greatly changed. From vinyl records to instant online streaming, the advancements in technology have been truly impressive. Long gone are the days of standing in line at the music store, or lugging around heavy electronic equipment (Ramey, "Modern Technology Advantages And Disadvantages"). By discussing how music was listened to throughout the ages one can appreciate the convenience that…

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    for the future, or at least musicians and producers don’t want to. The music industry was uncomfortable with change because change caused a “lost touch with consumers, and [the industry] got comfortable riding a pricey cash cow--the compact disc”(Kot 1). This lack of enthusiasm for change has caused a loss of money because the industry is stuck in a phase of technology that allows musicians and producers to profit. Technology is decreasing the amount of money artists make and advanced…

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    Periodically the Australian Music Industry has gone through constant periods of growth and alteration. Digitisation shows this transformation, as the traditional consumption of live music has shifted from $26 billion to $15 billion over a 15 year span (2014). This modernised landscape, has largely affected the physical presence of the industry's multi-layered persona. This adaptation is presented in the ‘Australian Independent Music Market report’, which stated digital revenue from downloads and…

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