Sociological Perspectives On Abortion

Superior Essays
Isaiah Rodriguez
Professor Van Hoff
Comp and Lit 101
16 October 2016

Abortion, the process of terminating a pregnancy, is an extremely controversial issue in terms of morality and politics. While abortion can occur naturally via miscarriage, induced abortion is an intentional procedure involving surgery or medication to terminate a pregnancy. Abortion has been debated by the Supreme Court throughout recent history and by both ends of the political spectrum. This governmental debate has lead to a myriad of social opinions. The various sociological perspectives define a variety of beliefs about abortion and can help people in understanding the recent debate over Planned Parenthood funding.
A 2013 study regarding motives behind induced abortions
…show more content…
The feminist perspective believes that the decision to abort a pregnancy should be made by the pregnant woman. In her article “Abortion Through a Feminist Ethics Lense,” Susan Sherwin advocates for women taking control of their reproductive lives because they are often subordinate and unable to control their own sexuality. In terms of the fetus, feminists see it as relational to the female carrying it. Personality is valued instead of existence according to this theory (Sherwin). Abortion is an issue that directly relates to female rights, and feminists believe women should be granted the right to choose abortion if desired or …show more content…
Sociological imagination comes into play; abortion is a personal issue for each woman who desires to undergo the procedure, but these women are often held back by public opinion and restrictive governmental laws. Conflict theory also comes into play because the government is trying to defund the organization to prevent it from administering abortions. The government wants to keep the power in this situation. If they cannot prevent Planned Parenthood from funding abortions with private donations, then they are going to try to lessen its funds as a whole because they do not believe in its motives. Symbolic interactionism would highlight how Planned Parenthood could be a symbol. For some, it is a symbol with a negative connotation that represents ending lives through abortion, while others see it as a positive assistance resource allowing women to be autonomous over their reproductive lives.
No clear solution exists for this issue because people are so divided on the topic. There is no way to please everyone regarding this complex, controversial issue. Sociologists are put in a tough position because they can do objective research on public opinion and women’s motives behind desiring an abortion, but they cannot be subjective in how they go about seeking solutions if they wish to remain

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