Roe V. Wade Problem

Superior Essays
Thousands of children are in a “life or death” situation, in which their life is chosen by the mother. The mother decides, without seeing or knowing the baby, whether to keep or abort the child. Abortion has caused many outbreaks throughout history and has influenced the world that we live in today. Over time, this controversial issue has divided people.
Restrictions on abortions were challenged among the sexual revolution and feminist movements of the 60’s (“Roe v. Wade (1973) para. 2). Since abortion was illegal during the 60s, women sought black market abortions by unlicensed physicians ("Why Is Roe v. Wade So
Important?” para. 2). In 1965, abortion was so unsafe due to bleeding, infection, and poisoning from objects used to induce abortion
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Wade Facts: What You Need to Know about the Decision” para. 10).
This case was filed by Roe in 1971 against Henry B. Wade, the district attorney of
Dallas, Texas (“Roe v. Wade Facts: What You Need to Know about the Decision” para. 5). The
District Court of Texas found that the law did violate Roe’s rights. The court denied a ruling that would have prevented the law from being enforced (“Landmark Cases of the U.S. Supreme
Court” pg. 634). Wade appealed to the United States Supreme Court, which reviewed the case throughout 1971-1972 (“Roe v. Wade” para. 2). Due to the process and time of this case being reviewed, Norma had her child and gave it up for adoption (“Roe v. Wade Facts: What You
Need to Know about the Decision” para. 8).
On January 22, 1973, the United States Supreme Court ruled that Texas’ abortion law was unconstitutional in a 7-2 court ruling (“Roe v. Wade Facts: What You Need to Know about the Decision” para. 4). The court based its decision on the first, fourth, ninth, and fourteenth amendments (“Roe v. Wade” para. 2). The first amendment prohibits the federal government from limiting freedom of religion, speech, press, and freedom of assembly. The
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Pro-Choice Debate
Believes” para. 5). Pro-Life advocates argue that non-viable, undeveloped human life is protected by the government (“What Each Side in the Pro-Life vs. Pro-Choice Debate Believes” para. 6). Supporters of Pro-Choice believe that human life cannot be proven before viability and
5
that the government does not have the right to invade a women’s privacy (What Each Side in the
Pro-Life vs. Pro-Choice Debate Believes” para. 7). Norma McCorvey proclaimed a Christian faith and she now has the prospective of a Pro-Life supporter (“Why Is Roe v. Wade So
Important?” para. 17).
The two presidential candidates have opposing views on abortion. Donald Trump stated his beliefs when he said, “Let me be clear— I am pro-life… I did not always hold this position, but I had a significant personal experience that brought the precious gift of life into perspective for me.” (“Where Do the Candidates Stand on Abortion?” para. 1). Donald Trump has also stated that he does not agree with partial-birth abortions, which are performed by pulling the living baby out feet first. The doctors leave the head of the baby in the womb,

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