For A Breath I Tarry Analysis

Great Essays
Increased technology leads to unprecedented opportunities for advancement. Today’s technology facilitates the ability to create robots with human characteristics and functions. This opens discussion concerning the relationship between robots and humans. Two stories that take part in this discussion are “For a Breath I Tarry”, by Roger Zelazny and “The Algorithms for Love” by Ken Liu. Both of these works explores what it means to be human through the sci-fi elements of machines and transformation of artificial intelligence. These stories offer different perspectives that examine the relationship between machines and humans and what it means to be human. In “For a Breath I Tarry”, Zelazny describes a futuristic world in which humans have become extinct and the world is run by robots. One specific machine, Frost, controls the Northern Hemisphere. He becomes interested in learning about humans and eventually aims to be become one. The story is a fable that follows his transformation into a human. Zelazny focuses on the differences between Frost as a machine and as a human, and he explores these through Frost’s transformation. In contrast, “The Algorithms for Love” does not have the optimistic tone of Zelazny’s fable. The …show more content…
“For a Breath I Tarry” uses a fable to change a machine into an actual human, emphasizing the need for emotions and distinct human abilities. “The Algorithms for Love” tells a story where it is possible to create a machine that looks and acts like a human. But, for it to actually be one the reader must accept the idea that human life is controlled by predictable preprogrammed algorithms. Despite the ability to look and act like a human, a robot lacks the essentials that makes a human feel and perceive. Perhaps a robot could devalue intelligence, but it could not devalue humanity as we can create and perceive beauty, fell happiness and despair and it is incapable of

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