Essay On Ice Cream Shop

1314 Words 6 Pages
“What does your vanilla ice cream taste like?” he asked. Dumbfounded, I responded with the only reply I could think of that wouldn’t get me fired, “Err...it tastes like vanilla bean. Would you like a sample, sir?” He responded, however, exactly as I had hoped he wouldn’t, “No, I don’t want a sample. I just really want to know what it tastes like.” What in my life could have prepared me for a fully-grown, English speaking man asking me what vanilla tastes like? My high school certainly hadn’t taught a class on “How to Interact with Idiotic Customers”. In fact, high school hardly prepared me for my time working. Surprisingly enough, analyzing Emily Dickinson’s poetry and using proper Turabian formatting did not come up in the interview. Instead, …show more content…
Furthermore, the store, Humphry Slocombe, stands among the most popular ice cream stores in the Bay Area and continues to receive critical acclaim. The location I worked at also happens to be located in the Ferry Building, one of the most famous tourist locations in San Francisco. Consequently, I, a freshly graduated high school student with no prior work experience, had no idea what to do. Nevertheless, my boss threw me right into the line after a few minutes of watching other people scoop and serve. Although I tried my hardest, I became painfully aware of my sloth-like scooping speed; I would cause backups in service because I would have one, two, or even three of my coworkers waiting on me to finish my scoop so they could grab some for their own customers. Eventually, however, I got in the knack of things; after a few weeks, I managed to pick up some new scooping techniques whilst also learning the other responsibilities of the job. I became a fully contributing member of the team, but I didn’t realize it until long afterwards. At the time, I had no idea how well I was doing - I had never experienced a work environment in which I did not receive constant feedback on my performance. Almost all of my coworkers had worked there for months or even years, so of course they could scoop, ring-up, and clean faster than me. I didn’t understand this, though, and …show more content…
If I studied hard and prepared well, I would receive a better grade and positive feedback. This system provided a nice, transparent cause-and-effect relationship between work and reward. I am also lucky enough to have had excellent teachers in high school. All of them greatly cared about me and my personal development: if they thought they could help me improve on something, they would ask to see me outside of class; if I needed extra help, all of them would make time for me. It only made sense to me that if I put in the effort, I would receive immediate praise from the person responsible for reviewing my work, so why didn’t it happen at the store? To answer this question simply: my coworkers and bosses treated me as an adult instead of treating me as child - they expected and trusted me to understand what I had done well and what I needed to improve on. If I didn’t know how to do something, no one would notice and come over to teach me, because everyone had his or her own work to do. If I asked someone to instruct me on how to do something, however, anyone would happily slow down and explain it. At first, this newfound responsibility for my own performance scared me - I didn’t know what it was like to work without continual guidance and surveillance. For the first few weeks, I constantly feared my coworkers judging the size and

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