Social theory

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    Social Learning Theories

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    Social learning theory. Krumboltz, Mitchell, and Jones (1976) theory suggests the interaction of genetic influences, cognitive processes, emotional processes, and environmental conditions influence peoples’ career choices and work related behaviours (Feller, Honaker, & Zagzebski, 2001; Krumboltz & Worthington, 1999; Osipow, 1990). In particular, they emphasize that peoples selection of careers are based on what they have learned from encounters with other individuals, institutions and events, especially, young adults who are building their career identities (Feller et al., 2001; Krumboltz et al., 1976). Learning experiences, especially observational learning from significant role models (e.g., parents and teachers), have a powerful influence…

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    The Social Exchange Theory

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    A Fading Friend but Not Forgotten When I was a kid, I was a social and outgoing kind of person. In Kindergarten, I met a friend named Jeremy. He was anti-social, awkward, and an all-around goofball. He always made me laugh though and from that point on, we became best friends. I remember as a kid, going to his house and playing Super Nintendo with him, eating with his family, sharing birthdays, and watching Power Rangers. Both of our fathers have disabilities. My father was hit by a drunk…

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    Social Bond Theory

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    Reaction Paper: Race, Social Bonds and Juvenile Attitudes Toward Police: How Perceptions of Police Come About In this paper I will argue the typology of theories used and whether the evidence is strong, adequate or inadequate. The authors of my article is trying to focus on the perceptions of adolescents about police. They manage to display a macro perspective within the article; the macro perspective allows the outside structures to shape an individual’s views and/ or opinions. It is apparent…

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    Social Strain Theory

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    Social Learning Theory and Strain Theory (Siegel & Walsh 2016 pp. 111) Social learning theory implies that criminal behavior is learned through close interactions with others, this theory, based on the assumption that all children are good at birth and have been taught to be bad. Depending on the children’s peer environment, any deviant values from interaction of family, friends or associates. If brought up in the wrong environment, nine out of ten will probably cave-in to crime. As…

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    The two that most apply are the strain theory and social control theory. The strain theory, according to Glick and Miller, “views crime and delinquency as a result of the anger and frustration people feel because of their inability to achieve the American dream’’ (2008). This theory applies to this research because prisoners returning to society are often lacking resources that other non-offenders readily have available. Without those resources to achieve the “American dream”, a prisoner may…

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    Humans thrive to fulfill their desires and needs. Anomie theory and Social Bonding theory provide very different explanations of why people commit or do not commit crimes and how humans function. Robert Merton focused on Anomie theory, also known as Strain theory, which focused on how American culture defines monetary success as a predominant cultural goal to which all its citizens should aspire (Walsh 147). Anomie is a term meaning “lacking in rules” or “normlessness” used by Durkheim to…

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    Social Control Theory is one of the most widely accepted theories for explaining criminal behavior and delinquency. Being first titled social control theory by “Travis Hirschi in his 1969 book, Causes of Deliquency.” (Costello, 2010) Social control theory has had the influence from earlier criminologists like Hobbes, Bentham and Beccaria where they stated that basically every individual’s human nature is selfish (Costello, 2010) and due to that selfishness people will usually commit delinquent…

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    (Hill, N. (2009). In addition, studies have shown that a child’s educational accomplishment and cognitive development are the results of the child’s social environment. There have been a host of research on children’s social environment and its influences on academic achievement (Hill, 2009; Hall, 2007; Siraj and Mayo, 2014). The proposed theory for this study is the Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) (Bandura, 1977). This theory suggests that people learn from their…

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    The social learning theory developed by Albert Bandura states that learning occurs as a result of observing the behaviour, attitudes and outcomes of behaviour of others. The theory is sometimes known as modelling as the premise of the theory rests of the fact that humans observe each other and use these observations to inform them on their own behaviour. The individual then is said to be as a result of their environment and vice versa. Although it is Albert Bandura that is credited with the…

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    an account of the causes of crime, some of the effects of crime and their social implications in the society. The development of human beings is controlled by traits that individuals are born with (Siegel 2010). Criminology theories explain the existence of certain behaviours in individuals but do not give an account of why criminal rates change from one place to another. There have been many theories explaining why crime exists in the society today. These theories use facts through observations…

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