Mass surveillance

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    conducting mass surveillance on everyone. Not until Edward Snowden, a former employee of the NSA (National Security Agency), exposed how much data the U.S. had collected on its citizens in 2013, it was not known to the public. Since then, controversy has stirred up on whether it is justifiable for the U.S. to invade its people’s privacy in the sake of national security. It is not justifiable, nor constitutional, for the U.S. to invade its people’s privacy through the means of conducting…

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    Mass surveillance will not work because various kinds of warrantless surveillance the government uses undermine privacy, causing a tension between the target groups and the government. As a necessary part of human rights, privacy allows individuals to live free and gives them a powerful feeling, which is essential to security and satisfaction. With privacy, people have their right to prevent their lives from being intruded by others. However, as the frequency of threats to U.S. national security…

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    whistle blowers, such as Edward Snowden, and Julian Assange, revealed that the NSA had increased its mass surveillance, specifically with regards to the collection of ‘big data’. While some commentators, say that mass surveillance is a necessary evil (Monk, 2013), and that “you have nothing to fear if you have nothing to hide”, others say that state mass surveillance is a gross misuse of power (Suleman, 2013). This essay will seek to critically discuss both the merits, and shortcomings of mass…

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    c) Simon’s opinion about Why Mass Surveillance Violates International Law. 2. Paragraph 1: Does: Introduces different countries are trying to limit internet users from either posting anonymously or using encryption to communicate securely. Says: Ecuador’s internet user need to use real name on online, and “pseudonyms are outlawed in Vietnam” (para 1). Paragraph 2: Does: The author gives evidence said government try to stop internet user use from posting anonymously has violate…

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    Who wouldn’t spend a couple billion dollars if it meant that acts like 9/11 or large massacres could be avoided? Proponents of mass surveillance claim that they do just that. If systems like the NSA actually had a positive track record of doing this there may be far less retaliation to their disobedient methods. In 2013, a government review began on these surveillance programs and “That winter, a panel set up by Obama to review the NSA 's operations concluded that the agency had stopped no…

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    all in the name of national security. Mass surveillance is already put in place and now they want to ban encryption. The government 's surveillance system and attempted overreach is unjustified and there is a way to make everyone better off. Part of the concern of privacy is is whether the government should have the ability to collect the personal data of everyone to detect terrorists. A system is already in place called the Mass Warrantless Surveillance Network. MWSN looks for, “atypical…

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    The American people are split over the idea of the NSA’s mass surveillance some say it prevented another attack like 9/11 from happening while others say it is unconstitutional and steals privacy from innocent Americans. Rewind a little bit the NSA started this surveillance shortly after 9/11/2001 when America was attacked by terrorists. At the time the program was kept secret to protect the NSA. They did this because they wanted to be able to try to prevent terror without backlash from the…

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    In a post- WWII society rampant with dystopian versions of the future, few novels capture the most evident dangers of totalitarianism and the exercising of mass-surveillance better than George Orwell’s 1984. Through examining Winston’s introspective moments while committing “thought crimes,” it is clear that institutionalized fear works to empower Big Brother by using party members own subconsciouses’ against themselves; a tactic which shows how the psychological impact of a surveillance state…

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    The U.S. government has a long history of using various kinds of surveillance tools to monitor citizens’ activities. During the Cold War, the FBI ran a domestic counterintelligence program called COINTELPRO protect the national security from hostile foreign threats; however, the program evolved into an effort to suppress non-violent protest groups and political dissidents with an array of illegal activities (Hutchinson). COINTELPRO negatively influenced the Civil Rights and Black Power…

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    (1650)The Governmental Abuse of Power: The Unethical Misuse of Satellite Surveillance Technology in Enemy of the State (1998) This film study will define the unethical misuse of satellite surveillance technology by the government in Enemy of the State (1998), which is a form of governmental abuse of the privacy and legal rights of the citizen. The use of satellite technology in this film defines the power of the National Security Agency (NSA) to observe and monitor the general public as a form…

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