Kabul

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    The victory of the Mujahedeens brought hope that war would end soon and peace would return to Afghanistan. However, the hope for peace and stability was shuttered when various ethnically based factions of Mujahedeens entered Kabul by force and took control of certain parts of the capital in 1992. Transition of power from communist regime to an Islamic regime came through war as well. The Mujahedeens who fought against communists for Islamic ideology were now fighting for ethnic supremacy. After the collapse of communist regime, ethnic conflicts became the new reality in Afghanistan (Cramer and Goodhand 2002). Ethnic alliances were formed against one another. Before the start of the civil war, most of the Mujahedeen parties rejected several attempts of a power-sharing government. Even though Ahmad Shah Masood, the legendary guerilla fighter proposed an agreement on power-sharing government among leaders of Mujahedeens before the civil war begun, yet the negotiation failed and fighting began in various parts of the country (Schmitt 2009, 254). Moreover, United Nations’ proposal for…

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    with Amir wanting the betterment of himself. The attack in Kabul leads to a negative impact over society, by the rebels, and lastly the enchantment of oneself from the weak to the strong between Amir, Hassan and Sohrab. In the novel The Kite Runner the following scenes which are the rape of Hassan, the invasion of the Taliban and the use of the slingshot by Hassan and Sohrab, demonstrates the corruption of power. Firstly, Hassan’s rape…

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    Anisa Karam Research Paper

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    Nine year old, Anisa Karam* stood at the door of her small house in Kabul, Afghanistan and had to watch her father be dragged to the sidewalk outside. The members of the Taliban who had come to the door said they had orders to kill him because he had continued to allow his daughter to go to school. For them, it was not enough that she was no longer able to go, but that someone had disobeyed them with a decision like this. Nearing nine o’clock at night, they shot him in the middle of the walkway.…

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    1.How does Laila’s life in Murree contrast with her life in Kabul? Laila 's life in Murree is much better than her life in Kabul. She is safer due to the fact that Rasheed is no longer abusing her or her children and is now in the hands Tariq. In Kabul she was forced to things she wasn 't comfortable doing and forced her to keep herself shut. In Pakistan she has the freedom to do things she couldn 't do while she was in Kabul. 2.Is Laila’s expectation that Zalmai will learn to accept his…

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    Flaws In The Kite Runner

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    family, hurts his closest friend, and all of Amir’s decisions are made selfishly. Khaled Hosseini’s protagonist, Amir, demonstrates courage while facing his past and standing up to others, in order to redeem himself from his wrong doings. Amir courageously travels to Kabul in order to rescue Sohrab, in hopes to fix his taunting mistakes. In the beginning of the novel, Amir wrongs his best friend, Hassan, and believes if he saves Hassan’s son from his horrible life, he can relieve himself…

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    the way around the world. Khaled Hosseini’s historical novel The Kite Runner is a story about Amir, a Pashtun, who attempts to find his place in the world after past events throughout his childhood leave him traumatized. Amir feels guilty about how he treated his half-brother, Hassan. Hassan is killed by the Taliban, and Amir is offered redemption from his guilt. As an adult, Amir acts upon this offer and travels to Afghanistan to help Hassan’s son, Sohrab, find a new home. After a long struggle…

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    Hossseni accentuates that Amir has privilege and gets away from ordeals and trouble. “Everyone agreed that my father, my baba, had built the most beautiful house in the Wazir Akbar Khan district, a new and affluent neighborhood in the northern part of Kabul”, (Hosseni, 4). Consequently, he recognized that he did well off and for that when he did things, for example steal the watch and put blame on Hassan, he got away with it because it became easy to bring Hassan down because he’s in a lower…

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    Afghanistan Research Paper

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    It is very similar to our government because it also has three branches, the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branch. The current president of Afghanistan is Ashraf Ghani. He is an Anthropologist by education and was the former Chancellor of Kabul University. Through the years by the U.S. Forces still being occupied in the country and helping support its democracy, the Afghan Government is still has its downfall when it comes to voting. There were reports of corruption due to election…

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    the force of power and politics molding the Afghanistan lifestyle. The novel is told from Amir’s point of view as he experiences a guilt ridden life filled with his search for atonement for betraying his loyal, close friend and servant, Hassan, who is a Hazara. After twenty years of anguish from his haunting burden, Amir receives a call from a dear friend, Rahim Khan, who offers him the opportunity to redeem himself adding, “[t]here is a way to be good again” (Hosseini 2). Amir, a rich Pashtun,…

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    Sidiqis’ successes and growth mindset. Lives in city of Kabul had changed overnight when the Taliban seized control from 1996-2001. Afghani women faced the harshest policies under Taliban rule. Not only they banned from school, work but they also need to be fully covered and not allowed to be on the street without a male escort. Under the Taliban’s rule, many women became sole breadwinner for their family when the male members forced to flee the city. Despite the difficulties, women learned to…

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