Jacques Lacan

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    gender and sexuality and those of Judith Butler, whose thorough deconstruction of structuralist iterations of cisheteronormative literary theory have provided the means for post-structuralists to address the effects of gender and sexuality essentialism on literature and its immense social impact. A central point in Butler’s book, Antigone’s Claim, is its challenge to the notion of socio-symbolically insupportable desire and aberrant gender non-conformity as a drive to certain death. Despite being centered on Antigone, a Greek play far removed from Wilde (except perhaps by overlap in commentary), it’s applications to Dorian Gray are immense – especially in light of the Lacanian reading of the novel by Ragland-Sullivan I shall be addressing. Jacques Lacan’s theories have been broadly and extensively applied as psychoanalytical near-gospel to Antigone, and despite the massive differences between both works, the substance and the manner in which Lacan’s positions of symbolic death are laid over analyses of both is exceptionally similar. As this paper delves into Ellie Ragland-Sullivan’s reading of Dorian Gray, we will see how this fatalism presents itself in structuralism – Wilde’s novel fulfills the structuralist demand for discipline against Symbolic transgressions. Put in Ragland-Sullivan’s own terms: “The novel’s climax is attributable, then, to Dorian’s final realization that it was impossible to sustain his own narcissistic ideal image in light of the harsh judgements…

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    metaphorically. These societal relations in the context of the poem were the pack of literary allusions, myths, legends and images which the poet incorporated in his poem. He found that every horror of the contemporary century which he brought about in the poem found a voice as well as bore a relation to many literary texts of past and present both. The poet associates a chain of signifiers in a metonymic displacement. In the poem loss of spirituality is associated with ‘a heap of broken…

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    mother. As soon as the father consciously gets recognized by a child, the Oedipus complex is created. By that stage, a child is possessive of the mother and wants the father out of the picture since he now represents a threat to the mother-child relationship. This leads into the anal and phallic stages. Anal stage revolves around finding pleasure within retaining and expulsing waste and phallic stage focuses the attention to genitals (Ott & Mack, 2014). Within these phases, the love of gazing…

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    Jacques Lacan’s theory of development explains how infants mature psychologically. The stages of his concept include the Imaginary, the Mirror, and the Symbolic. The first is where children begin to understand control. Babies learn to manipulate their environment as an extension of their own base needs and desires. There is no separation between the baby and the outside world. Following the discovery of control, infants undergo the Mirror stage, where they learn to recognize their own image…

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    must abstain from sinful acts; Kristeva writes that “abjection persists as exclusion or taboo (dietary or other) in monotheistic religions [...] it finally encounters with Christian sin, a dialectic elaboration, as it becomes integrated in the Christian Word as a threatening otherness––but always nameable, always totalizeable” (Kristeva 17). Kristeva stems most of her understanding of the abject from the close examination of the arguments of Sigmund Freud, one being that the unconscious…

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    Powder In the short story “Powder”, the theme love is portrayed the most through deep connections between father and son. These two characters alone express bond that love can create between families. A father and son begin to drive through the snow storm until they are stopped at a road block by an officer. Love is first shown when the father stops to tell the son that they have to make it back in time for dinner so that the mom won’t feel let down once again as she has been lately. This is…

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    He isn’t—the concept of this mirror phase is simply more applicable in other stages of life, rather than just between 6-18 months. He actually touches on this broadness, though not in the same direct manner, saying that “[i]t suffices to understand the mirror stage […] as an identification, in the full sense analysis gives to the term” (Lacan 76). He himself is defining this stage of development as a manner of identification. Mirriam-Webster defines that word as a “psychological orientation of…

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    Critical Reflection #3: Jane Flax (2004) In Flax’s What Is the Subject? Review Essay on Psychoanalysis and Feminism in a Postcolonial Time (2004), she questions whether or not psychoanalytic theory, which is heavily centred on sex and gender identity, would be able to withstand the inclusion of other factors like race. She argues that both feminism and psychoanalysis has been treated expressed through a white, Western, middle class view and has done little to include issues around race and…

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    MYTH AND FAIRYTALE PSYCHOANALYSIS OF Abstract This paper entitled ‘psychoanalytic theory on Naga-Mandala’ regards as an analysis of psychological side of the play. The psychoanalytic theory is applicable on Naga-Mandala as Girish Karnad disseminates facts about human life and psyche of humans in ancient Indian stories with the changing social codes and morals of modern life. Girish Karnad’s plays are pertinent to the psychological problems, dilemmas, and conflicts defied by the modern Indian…

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    No Exit Symbolism

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    “Through me the way into the doleful city, / Through me the way into eternal grief, / Through me the way among a race forsaken. / ... / Abandon hope, forever, you who enter,” (Dante 20). When one thinks of the underworld one might expect see eternal flames and hear blood-curdling screams in pain, but what about a small dark room with two other people? What about living cooped up in one room, forever hearing the thoughts of another? Watching those alive forget about you? That’s where the…

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