Analysis Of Jacques Lacan's Theory Of Development

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Jacques Lacan’s theory of development explains how infants mature psychologically. The stages of his concept include the Imaginary, the Mirror, and the Symbolic. The first is where children begin to understand control. Babies learn to manipulate their environment as an extension of their own base needs and desires. There is no separation between the baby and the outside world. Following the discovery of control, infants undergo the Mirror stage, where they learn to recognize their own image in a mirror as something they can control, but as a separate entity. Then the child loses their power in the Symbolic stage to an authority figure. Lacan claims the father reveals the limited power the infant actually has. The child cannot control …show more content…
However, he thinks he is searching for companionship rather than domination. Lacan supports the concept that the unconscious need for control motivates people’s actions. Therefore, everything is a signifier that acts as a language “in order to signify something quite other than what it says” (“The Instance of the Letter” 452). The Creature’s actions reveal his search for “the real”. As he travels in the woods, he begins to find peace once again and he says, “I felt emotions of gentleness and pleasure, that had long appeared dead, revive within me” (Shelley 95). The woods remind him of the time in which he lived outside of the De Lacy home. This affects his actions when he witnesses a girl fall into a river. He immediately rushes to save the girl, and “dragged her to shore” (Shelley 95). His compassion is met with malice as a man rips the girl away. The Creature attempts to return to kindness, but reality reminds him of his apparent monstrous …show more content…
“I demand a creature of another sex, but as hideous as myself” (Shelley 99). He hopes to dominate his counterpart as he says the fact that they are monsters will make them “more attached to one another” (Shelley 99). Frankenstein begins to honor the request, but akin to the law that he is, he ultimately decides to destroy the female. Outraged, the Creature attempts to control Frankenstein and says, “You are my creator, but I am your master; — obey!” (Shelley 116). However, this fails and the Creature makes his threat, “I shall be with you on your wedding night” (Shelley 116). The oath manipulates Frankenstein until the wedding itself, as he is constantly in fear of what is to come. However, since waiting for the wedding will take too long, the Creature murders his creator’s close friend Clerval. This tortures Frankenstein as the nearby townspeople blame him for the

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