In the Absence of Truth

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    trials, which is consistent with the results of previous studies (Gratton et al., 1992; Botvinick et al., 1999). The interaction indicated that conflict adaptation had occurred, in that the difference in response times in current congruent or incongruent trials was indeed smaller when the current trial followed an incongruent trial. This finding was consistent with the results of the Botivinick et al.’s (1999) study where a similar interaction was found, but contradicted the results of the Mayr et al. (2003) study. The presence of conflict adaptation in the absence of exact stimulus repetitions was consistent with the authors’…

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    reasoning in arriving at his conclusion and then attempt to challenge some of the assumptions that Scriven makes in the course of his argument, and provide what I believe to be an example of a case where there can be a retrospective justification for having an arbitrary presumption of theism despite an absence of what would be conventionally considered to be evidence. Scriven begins by addressing…

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    Ethics Are Not Relative W.T. Stace argues in favour of ethical absolutism - the principle that ethics are not relative. I will be arguing that this is indeed the case: ethics are not relative; morality is an absolute that, no matter how much it is meddled with to suit the needs of someone, will not change. Ethics is the study of a way of life and its values, including a system of general moral principles and the conception of morality and its foundations. Ethical relativism states that ethics…

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    The Open Window Paradox

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    In both “Like the Sun” and “The Open Window”, the authors use paradox and irony. The stories have different conceptions of how truth, deception, and honesty play a role in the management of chaos. The two stories show how the absence of truth makes life more manageable, yet at the same time, it is a horrible thing. In this essay, I will explain the elements of truth, irony and paradoxes in the stories. In “Like the Sun”, the author uses paradox when he states that the headmaster’s music was a…

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    should be careful in what they say or do in court One of the many pitfalls that an expert witness will face is its legitimacy to stand as an expert witness. An expert witness will be closely examined by the judge. On their competency to provide legitimate information to the court. So the expert witness should instil confidence to the judge that they are a good expert witness and the information they give out to the court is trustworthy. So they should be always prepared when going to court so…

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    are defined of and by themselves, which is contrary to how the other segments of the line operate. For example, thoughts are defined by their constitution of multiple Eternal forms (Quality, Beauty, etc.), physical objects are defined by their physical properties (size, density, malleability, etc.), and deceit, the lowest form, is defined by its absence of the other three segments. The ideas of the eternal form as being defined exclusively by itself and deceit being defined by the absence of any…

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    In the graphic novel, Persepolis, written by Marjane Satrapi, the truth and rebellion are both very significant in Marji's life. Since Marji is so young for the majority of the book, most people around her continuously tell her false information or leave out details in an effort to shield Marji from the horrors of the world around her. This affects Marji's life greatly because she does not understand everything that's happening, she believes there's only one correct way and doesn't understand…

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    Murdoch approaches a number of issues but does not raise any of them to a level that can be considered as an absolute truth. From the title of the book, she does not explicitly take a truthful position of the meanings of the novel’s title. Other incidents that are falsely represented are Bradley Pearson’s initials, which do not help to identify the wretched truth hero at the peak of the evil. She seems to heavily borrow from Plato’s idea that the world of every day life is an illusion with a…

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    is perpetual. Consequently, this unknowingly ceases the freedom of the citizens of the World State. Ultimately, citizens of Brave New World’s society are in a constant state of imprisonment due to their inability to feel unhappy. Brave New World focuses on how happiness and truth cannot coexist through the use of soma, the use of science, and the theme of isolation. Soma fits into the utopian picture of absolute happiness. It is what completely erases the pain and misery creating a world where…

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    One would have to tell them the truth and where exactly their mother is located. Now telling them where your mother is would maximize that group of people’s happiness however, you are left heartbroken. So, while you are required to tell the truth to maximize utility you are having to deal with an enormous amount of pain. However, by following the theory your happiness does not play a role when making a decision. Hence, Mill’s theory is false because as we can see in the above example it requires…

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