The Dual Multiplex Of The Divided Line Analysis

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The Dual Multiplex of the Divided Line

Argument, in the conversational Platonic sense, is one possible way to come to accurate conclusions. In an argument, two or more opposing sides all present their evidence, and, upon deliberation, all sides come to a unanimous conclusion, which forms a thesis. In when more evidence is brought forward, the thesis is compared to the antithesis, and synthesis occurs through which a new, more refined thesis is created. In Plato’s Republic, this dialectical process is used to define Justice, first in the macroexample of a hypothetical perfect state, and then for the individual. When coming to to the definition of Justice, Socrates argues his points by finding apparent contradictions, and then resolving them
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The eternal forms are defined of and by themselves, which is contrary to how the other segments of the line operate. For example, thoughts are defined by their constitution of multiple Eternal forms (Quality, Beauty, etc.), physical objects are defined by their physical properties (size, density, malleability, etc.), and deceit, the lowest form, is defined by its absence of the other three segments. The ideas of the eternal form as being defined exclusively by itself and deceit being defined by the absence of any eternal form go against the standard meaning of the word “definition.” Usually a definition is the exact meaning of something, while, most importantly, not using the thing of the definition in the definition itself, since, when something is compared to itself, no further insight or clarification is derived. This presents a duality that separates the line even further into 2 different sections [AD] and [BC]. Both deceit and Truth, here substituted as an example for convenience of argument for the eternal forms, fall under the same category because they cannot be defined by anything. Truth is self-defining, and Deceit is the complete absence of Truth. That leaves both scientific observations and abstract knowledge, which can both be defined using applications of other segments of the divided

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