The Apology: The Dilemmas Of Plato's Apology

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The most authentic, valid, and useable record that has been kept protected and unspoiled of Socrates’ defense of himself is the Apology. While the words penned in the Apology were not documented at the time they were spoken, Plato was present at the trial and; therefore, the record documented in the Apology was the words and confrontations of Socrates as Plato remembered them. However, one should put in mind that Plato was an admirer of Socrates and believed he is the true hero; in addition, he was still a student. Therefore, he may have been biased, in favor of Socrates, in the Apology. The Apology’s main focus is on Socrates’ responses to the different charges which are leveled against him by different accusers. The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate how Socrates replied to the main charge he was …show more content…
Meletus doesn’t neither comprehend the idea of charges he is making, nor is he ready and capable enough to see the valid and logical consequences inferred in the announcements he has been making. This makes Socrates either isn’t exacerbating the whole population or he is doing so unintentionally; and therefore, Socrates is blameworthy of no wrongdoing and should not be rebuffed. Next Socrates’ asks Meletus a few questions; he asks him to state why he is accusing him of corrupting the youth? And how he does so? Is it by teaching the youth not to acknowledge and recognize the gods that the state believes in and acknowledges? Or does he insist that Socrates doesn’t believe in god and is in fact and atheist? Meletus then responses to all the questions Socrates has asked, he said that Socrates is and atheist because of the fact that he does not have confidence and doesn’t believe or trust in the godhead of the sun or moon, as he shows and teaches youth that the sun is stone and the moon

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