In The Apology Of Socrates And Republic

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Philosophy For The State
In the Apology of Socrates and Republic, it is argued that philosophy is beneficial for the state. Advantageous can be considered an outcome that is profitable. A state is an area controlled by a ruler. Therefore, the question is whether philosophy is a reasonable method of ruling an area and in what ways. Taking the side of Socrates and his student Plato, I will show that philosophy is profitable for the state in the following ways with a focus on civilian’s behaviour: first, philosophy will make individuals wise; secondly, each individual will be treated fairly and lastly, by philosophy will reduce the amount of disagreements within a state.
A philosopher-king, by its literal definition would be a king that engages
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Wisdom is the state of having experience, knowledge and good judgment. As a result, each individual will be treated in a reasonable manner. Philosophy like all other subjects emphasizes that wrongful actions and disobedience to anyone is an act worthy of desiring forgiveness (29b6-29b8). If a city can be based on philosophy, disobedience, unethical and unjust actions will be greatly reduced. As these undesired components are eliminated, a new city will emerge; one that Socrates desires. Socrates desires a society in which everyone will be free from evil (Republic,473d4-473d5). The Apology of Socrates is a perfect example to consider. In The Apology, Socrates considers himself to be a gadfly (30e5); one who was sent by the gods to keep the city alive by illuminating civilians and influencing them to nurture their virtue while disregarding his own matters (30e7, 31b-31b5). If Meletus and his supporters had been wise, they should not have wrongfully convicted Socrates for an act that he did not commit. As for the juror, one can say that he has broken his oath of giving justice where it is due …show more content…
Based on the wisdom acquired, individuals will be able to do four things out of the many that can be done. Firstly, it will allow them to comprehend the philosopher-king’s viewpoint; secondly, the philosopher-king will have little issues making his verdict on matters; thirdly, if the philosopher-king requires advise, he has his civilians to lean on and lastly, the civilians are able to guide their ruler according to his values. These four tasks not only reduce the probability of an uproar similar to Afghanistan but also accomplishes the following: eliminates evil and unifies the state which in turn results in an utopian society. A utopian society is simply, a perfect society. It is a society in which disease, discrimination, inequality, oppression, poverty and war are invisible. A utopian society is also what Socrates wishes and is trying to establish. In the Republic, Socrates mentions that combining philosophy and political power will establish a perfect society where both the city and human beings will be free from evil. He also mentions that in doing so, there will be happiness both publicly and privately

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