Plato's Apology Argument

970 Words 4 Pages
Every human being has the ability to decide what they believe and what they do not. At a very early age, we develop judgement that allows us to choose whether or not to accept certain claims. These assertions may be tempting, but our reasoning allows us to critically analyze the information with respect to all of our previous knowledge. These claims may be faith based, fact-based, or opinion. Without recognizing it, we take every bit of information we gather, analyze it, and decide whether we accept its validity. To what extent we criticize the information varies from person to person, much like the things we choose to believe. This is our philosophy. Philosophy is an endless process of questioning and interpreting our world. It can change …show more content…
In Plato’s Apology, Socrates is put on trial for accusations of disruptive behavior. Some men in the community feel that his way of life goes against the will of the Gods and corrupts the youth. As he stands before a jury that will ultimately decide his fate, Socrates states that “the difficulty… is not in avoiding death, but in avoiding the unrighteousness” (Plato 38). Socrates knows that death is inevitable, and repeatedly claims he does not fear it. He believes that it is harder to run from the injustices and evils of the world than it is from death, so he defends his philosophy even after execution becomes the verdict. Socrates’ philosophical attitude may have resulted in his death, but he has no change of heart when he learns his …show more content…
However, he lived his life peacefully unaware of any absolute truths, and death is no exception. To find such tranquility in the unknown, long before his end, was Socrates’ greatest accomplishment, and it was because of his philosophical attitude. Socrates did find his peace of mind. This allowed him to live intelligently, constantly criticizing the close-minded beliefs of others, and morally, with all respect for other beings and the Gods. Time and time again, the philosophical attitude is used as a tool for philosophers to see beyond their restricted perceptions of reality. This widened view of the world maximizes morality and understanding, and accelerates the flow of intelligent ideas. Socrates displays this in his wisdom and his actions, and Murphy describes this with his “piece of mind” analogy. Every individual may have their own opinions about how an intelligent and moral life is lived, but a philosophical attitude allows one to reside in a world of uncertainty with

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