The Moral Theory Of Mill's Greatest Happiness Principles

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Through Mill’s view on Utilitarianism there emerges a core moral theory called the greatest happiness principle. However, I believe that Mill’s Greatest Happiness Principle is false. I believe this because after examining his theory I noticed several flaws within his theory. Before I say what is wrong with Mill’s argument and theory I want to address the definition of the greatest happiness principle and what all it encompasses. Mill believes that “actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, [and] wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness” (Mill,97). Actions that bring about sadness or pain are therefore wrong in accordance to Mill’s theory. Within Mill’s theory there are several underlying theories however, …show more content…
However, there is one of several examples that shows this is not always true. Let’s say for example, that a group of people come to your house asking where your mother is because they want to kill her. Now if one were to act in accordance to Mill’s theory …show more content…
One would have to tell them the truth and where exactly their mother is located. Now telling them where your mother is would maximize that group of people’s happiness however, you are left heartbroken. So, while you are required to tell the truth to maximize utility you are having to deal with an enormous amount of pain. However, by following the theory your happiness does not play a role when making a decision. Hence, Mill’s theory is false because as we can see in the above example it requires too much sacrifice from an individual. The theory is false because it is not realistic nor probable. It requires the individual following the principle to experience pain even though the whole point behind the theory is to have an absence of pain. In addition, there are several conflicting viewpoints within Mill’s theory. The first conflicting viewpoint in Mill’s theory is that his principle does not actually maximize utility. For example, say we “have to choose between an act that benefits more people, and one that benefits fewer. Mill’s principle does not say we automatically have to pick the first option” (FE,124).

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