Hank Aaron

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    Hank Aaron By: Landon Hale 3/6 /17 “I never wanted them to forget Babe Ruth. I just wanted them to remember Hank Aaron,” Hank announced as he received his Hall of Fame award. Leading the Milwaukee Braves to their first World Series Championship in 1957 Hank Aaron was their leading hitter with a .322 batting average. Hank Aaron did not want to replace all the great baseball players like Babe Ruth and Moses Fleetwood Walker also known as Jackie Robinson. He just wanted to be known as a great player. Hank Aaron was a big contributor to American society and has a great significance in American history. Hank Aaron’s life was influenced by his youth when he had grown a major obsession with baseball. His major contributions to American society including winning the MVP award and the World Series, helped him earn his place in history as an important African American. First, Hank Aaron, known for being one of the best players of the late 20th century, was born on February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama (Biography.com). Hank Aaron was…

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    Hank Aaron Analysis

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    The Hank Aaron statue is located right outside of Turner Field. This bring statue is a representation of Henry Louis and was sculpted by Ed Dwight, Jr. on September 7, 1982. The sculpture is about nine feet tall which would be about a human and a half. The piece has a variety of straight, diagonal, horizontal, and curved lines. From the positioning of his legs and arms to the creases on his clothes and even the numbers and letters on his jersey. It is also pretty smooth, you can run your hand…

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    Hank Aaron, one of the greatest baseball players of all time, influenced many by his actions on and off the diamond. Hank Aaron was born in Mobile, Alabama on February 5, 1934. He was the the third of eight children in his family and the child of Herbert and Estella Aaron. Hank grew up fascinated about the sport of baseball. Any amount of free time Hank had he was playing some type of baseball. He grew up playing with only a stick and bottle caps. Herbert would occasionally make him baseballs…

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    The Steroid Era

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    the home run king should not be in the Hall of Fame? Voters believe the MLB takes it light and easy on players that take steroids, by making more benefits than consequences for players that have not used PEDs. Some players that have used PEDs have broken records held by legends of the game that were pure to it. “Steroids are ruining the origins of the game by having steroids take over the modern era, making no clear comparison from past to present” (Pollack 1). Brian Pollack argues that the Hall…

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    Hank Aaron Research Paper

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    American baseball icon Hank Aaron, nicknamed "Hammerin' Hank," is widely regarded as one of the greatest hitters in the history of the sport. He spent 21 years as an outfielder for the Milwaukee and Atlanta Braves and two final years as a DH for the Milwaukee Brewers, setting several records and winning a number of honors along the way. Aron continues to hold many of baseball's most distinguished records today, including runs batted in (2,297), extra-base hits (1,477), total bases (6,856) and…

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    Bush, 43rd president of the United States, co-owned the Texas Rangers MLB team for five years. He was a lifetime lover of baseball and believed that there was more to baseball than just the sport. "Baseball isn't just the stats. As much as anything else, baseball is the style of Willie Mays, or the determination of Hank Aaron, or the endurance of a Mickey Mantle, the discipline of Carl Yastrzemski, the drive of Eddie Mathews, the reliability of a (Al) Kaline or a (Joe) Morgan, the grace of a…

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    different. They found it in the faster paced, more violent, team-orientated, contact sport known as football. I still have to say that football will never take away “America’s Greatest Pastime” sport as baseball. “In 1960, the great Roger Kahn wrote in Sport magazine that ‘There is no denying America’s love for baseball, but increasingly the greater excitement seems to be coming from football fields, and that is where it’s likely to be coming in the future.” (Barra, 2013) Within the 1960’s…

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    He played his final two seasons in 1972 and 1973 as a part-time first baseman for the New York Mets. He then worked as a part-time hitting coach with the Mets until 1979. He was the first ballplayer with more than 3,000 hits and 500 home runs in his career. Mays won two National League (NL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) awards, ended his career with 660 home runs - third at the time of his retirement and currently fifth all-time - and won a record-tying 12 Gold Glove awards beginning in 1957 when…

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    Fences Symbolism

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    Do you understand after eighteen years I wanted to steal second?’’ (Fences, Act II, Scene I; 721) Rose is very serious about their marriage, as she explains to him how life is not a baseball game. Despite the seriousness of the matter that his infidelity caused, Troy has still related this to baseball which serves to show how much he wants to control life just as a game can be manipulated to have a winning team at the end. Baseball is used as a representation of how Troy lacks identity and…

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    Baseball Observation Essay

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    As I walked into the stadium, the smell of hotdogs and popcorn filled the air. It was a familiar setting. A setting I had grown to know very well because my dad loved baseball. The red white and blue colors were everywhere as fans came from every direction into the stadium. My dad and I walked to the outfield where the opposing team was warming up for the game. Turner Field in Atlanta was not only home of the Braves, but a home to many baseball fans. The concessions and amenities for the fans,…

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